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Ch 11: American Civil War (1861-1865): Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The American Civil War (1861-1865) chapter of this AP US History Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the Civil War. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the battles and events of the Civil War required in a typical AP US history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other AP US history work.
  • Identify the American Civil War concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our AP US history tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the American Civil War and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding Northern and Southern advantages, key Civil War battles, effects on the economy, Gettysburg, march on Richmond, Lincoln's assassination or any other American Civil War topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their American Civil War unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in AP US history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the American Civil War simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live AP US history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the American Civil War on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the advantages of the North and the South in the Civil War.
  • Describe the First Battle of Bull Run.
  • Discuss the key Civil War battles of 1862.
  • Understand the legacy of the Emancipation Proclamation.
  • Explain how the Civil War affected the economy and everyday life.
  • Learn about the turning points of the Civil War.
  • Describe the events that led to the end of the Civil War.
  • Discuss Sherman's March to the Sea.
  • Learn about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Lee's surrender at Appomattox.

20 Lessons in Chapter 11: American Civil War (1861-1865): Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

1. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

2. The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

Three months after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Northern troops attacked Southern forces near the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. The first Battle of Bull Run (or Manassas) was the first major engagement of the Civil War and a terrifying defeat for the Union spectators who came to watch.

Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

3. Key Civil War Battles in 1862: Monitor and Merrimac, Antietam, New Orleans & Shiloh

In 1862, the Union put its Anaconda Plan into action, resulting in several critical events: the Peninsular Campaign, the Battle of Hampton Roads between the ironclads Monitor and Virginia (Merrimack), the Battle of Shiloh, the capture of New Orleans, and the Battle of Antietam.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

4. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

5. How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

With the strongest and most productive demographic of society away fighting in the Civil War, the task of running homes, communities, and the nation fell to those who stayed behind. The war on the home front changed their lives forever.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

6. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

7. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Sherman's March to the Sea

8. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General William T. Sherman began his Atlanta campaign. His success assured Lincoln's re-election in 1864. Sherman then began his destructive March to the Sea in order to capture Savannah.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

9. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Confederate States of America: Formation, Government & Definition

10. Confederate States of America: Formation, Government & Definition

This lesson discusses the formation, government, and end of the Confederate States of America. Learn more about the republic that was created after several southern states seceded from the United States of America, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

General John Fremont: Facts, Timeline & Significance

11. General John Fremont: Facts, Timeline & Significance

John C. Frémont was an American explorer, Senator, presidential candidate, and Union general in the Civil War. He was one of the most famous and influential Americans of the mid-19th century and we'll be looking at him in this lesson.

Jefferson Davis, Confederate President: History & Facts

12. Jefferson Davis, Confederate President: History & Facts

In this lesson, learn about Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865). Before the Civil War, he was a U.S. Senator from Mississippi and secretary of war under Franklin Pierce.

John Hay: Biography & History

13. John Hay: Biography & History

John Hay served as the private secretary to Abraham Lincoln, as editor for the New York Tribune, and more notably as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt. He is best known for the Open Door Notes and the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty.

Mason-Dixon Line: Definition & History

14. Mason-Dixon Line: Definition & History

This lesson discusses the Mason-Dixon line. Learn more about the origins of the boundary that represents the symbolic border between the northern and southern United States, then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Siege of Vicksburg: Facts, Summary & Map

15. Siege of Vicksburg: Facts, Summary & Map

The Siege of Vicksburg, from May to July of 1863, resulted in the surrender of Confederate forces at Vicksburg on the Mississippi River. It was one of the biggest Union victories of the American Civil War.

The Confederacy: Definition & Explanation

16. The Confederacy: Definition & Explanation

South Carolina was the first state to withdraw from the Union on December 20, 1860. South Carolina asked the other slave states to form a new nation. Learn more about the definition and history of the Confederacy, and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Ulysses S. Grant in the Civil War: Facts, History & Achievements

17. Ulysses S. Grant in the Civil War: Facts, History & Achievements

Ulysses S. Grant was a Union general in the American Civil War. Due to his victories in the Western Theater in 1862 and 1863, he was promoted to command all Union armies in 1864. He was also the 18th U.S. president from 1869-1877.

What Were the Black Codes? - History & Explanation

18. What Were the Black Codes? - History & Explanation

The Thirteenth Amendment abolished the institution of slavery. Unfortunately, the newly attained freedom for African Americans was curtailed by the Southern adoption of the Black Codes. Learn how former slave states continued to oppress African Americans through this unequal system.

Famous & Important Women in the Civil War

19. Famous & Important Women in the Civil War

There were likely more than 400 female soldiers fighting in the Civil War and several female spies. They stepped out of their gender roles to participate. This lesson highlights a few of these fascinating women.

Biography of Elizabeth Blackwell: Facts & Accomplishments

20. Biography of Elizabeth Blackwell: Facts & Accomplishments

Did you know that Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to become a doctor in the United States? In this lesson, you will learn about the impressive life and achievements of Elizabeth Blackwell, including her contributions to medicine.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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