Ch 13: American History 1800 to 1900

About This Chapter

Review people and events from American history between 1800 and 1900 with the help of this chapter. Study key historical moments, such as the impact of Thomas Jefferson's presidency and the second Industrial Revolution.

American History 1800 to 1900 - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, our experts review all the major happenings from 1800-1900 in American history. You'll learn about historic moments, like the Mexican-American War, Lincoln's assassination, and the Reconstruction period, and study important people like Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Susan B. Anthony. Once you finish this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Discuss presidencies of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison
  • Analyze the westward expansion between 1820 and 1860
  • Describe the importance of Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Wilmot Proviso and the Spanish-American War
  • Analyze the impact of the succession of the southern states and the Civil War
  • Describe the creation, context and legacy of the Emancipation Proclamation
  • Discuss Abraham Lincoln's presidency and assassination
  • Explain the Reconstruction period and the Second Industrial Revolution
  • Understand the significance of Susan B. Anthony

If you need help with any of these lessons, use the Dashboard to ask for assistance from one of our experts. You can also navigate our videos using the timeline tags to review material again. Make sure to test your progress by completing the self-assessment quiz at the end of each lesson.

14 Lessons in Chapter 13: American History 1800 to 1900
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

1. Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

Thomas Jefferson is often noted as one of the best presidents in history. In our lesson, learn about some of President Jefferson's many famous domestic accomplishments and the controversy surrounding most of them.

President Madison and the War of 1812

2. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

Westward U.S. Expansion (1820-1860)

3. Westward U.S. Expansion (1820-1860)

This lesson will explain America's 19th century expansion into the West. It will define the concept of Manifest Destiny and highlight the displacement of Native Americans.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

4. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

Secession of the Southern States: Causes & Timeline

5. Secession of the Southern States: Causes & Timeline

In this lesson, we will explore the secession of the 11 states that made up the Confederate States of America. We will discover their reasons for leaving the Union and take a look at the motives of the slave states that chose not to join the Confederacy.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

6. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

7. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

8. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

9. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Abraham Lincoln: Presidency, Accomplishments & Assassination

10. Abraham Lincoln: Presidency, Accomplishments & Assassination

In this lesson, we will meet Abraham Lincoln, the Illinois rail-splitter and general store owner who eventually became the sixteenth president of the United States.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

11. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

12. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

Who Was Susan B. Anthony? - Women's Rights Facts & Significance

13. Who Was Susan B. Anthony? - Women's Rights Facts & Significance

This lesson discusses the life and work of Susan B. Anthony. Learn more about her fight for women's rights, including the fight for women's suffrage, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

The Second Industrial Revolution: Timeline & Inventions

14. The Second Industrial Revolution: Timeline & Inventions

The Second Industrial Revolution was another great leap forward in technology and society. New innovations in steel production, petroleum and electricity led to the introduction of public automobiles and airplanes. In this lesson, learn about the key inventions that spurred this revolution.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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