Ch 8: American History in the 1800s

About This Chapter

The American History in the 1800s chapter of this course is the most efficient way to study the events and people of nineteenth century America. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you understand the essential concepts associated with American history in the 1800s.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering American history of the 1800s material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn about American history during the nineteenth century. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing events and people associated with American history in the 1800s
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning American history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Watch each video in the course to review all key topics
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with the American History of the 1800s chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: The lessons in this course cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take the American History of the 1800s chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any American history question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about the nineteenth century for a standard American citizenship course. Topics covered include:

  • The expedition of Lewis and Clark
  • American wars in the nineteenth century
  • The Emancipation Proclamation and its legacy
  • Abraham Lincoln, his presidency and accomplishments
  • Susan B. Anthony and the early women's rights movement
  • Significant events of the presidencies of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison

11 Lessons in Chapter 8: American History in the 1800s
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

1. Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

Thomas Jefferson is often noted as one of the best presidents in history. In our lesson, learn about some of President Jefferson's many famous domestic accomplishments and the controversy surrounding most of them.

President Madison and the War of 1812

2. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

3. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

Secession of the Southern States: Causes & Timeline

4. Secession of the Southern States: Causes & Timeline

In this lesson, we will explore the secession of the 11 states that made up the Confederate States of America. We will discover their reasons for leaving the Union and take a look at the motives of the slave states that chose not to join the Confederacy.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

5. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

6. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

7. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

8. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Abraham Lincoln: Presidency, Accomplishments & Assassination

9. Abraham Lincoln: Presidency, Accomplishments & Assassination

In this lesson, we will meet Abraham Lincoln, the Illinois rail-splitter and general store owner who eventually became the sixteenth president of the United States.

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

10. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

Who Was Susan B. Anthony? - Women's Rights Facts & Significance

11. Who Was Susan B. Anthony? - Women's Rights Facts & Significance

This lesson discusses the life and work of Susan B. Anthony. Learn more about her fight for women's rights, including the fight for women's suffrage, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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