Ch 15: American Imperialism (1890-1919): Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The American Imperialism (1890-1919) chapter of this AP US History Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about America's influence on and expansion into foreign lands. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the events and policies of American imperialism required in a typical AP US history course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other AP US history work.
  • Identify the American imperialism concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our AP US history tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about American imperialism and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the Spanish-American War, imperialism in Hawaii and the Philippines, World War I causes, America's involvement in WWI or any other American imperialism topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their American imperialism unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in AP US history
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about American imperialism simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live AP US history tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about American imperialism on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the reasons for American imperialism.
  • Describe the causes and effects of the Spanish-American War.
  • Take a look at American imperialism in the Philippines, China, Hawaii, Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Explain what led to World War I.
  • Understand America's official position in World War I.
  • Describe America's involvement in WWI.
  • Learn about the end of WWI.

15 Lessons in Chapter 15: American Imperialism (1890-1919): Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

1. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

2. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

3. American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

American imperialism had a major effect on the world. In this lesson, find out how a nation became a part of the U.S. for almost 50 years and how one kingdom became a U.S. state. The effect of U.S. imperialism in Asia and the Pacific had a long-lasting and far-reaching effect that we can still see today!

American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

4. American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

Around the turn of the 20th century, the United States entered a period of non-colonial imperial expansion throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Learn about the short-term and long-term effects of some of these policies in this video lesson.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

5. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

6. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

7. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

8. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

Ellis Island: History & Facts

9. Ellis Island: History & Facts

Ellis Island was the main entry point during the height of European immigration (1890s-1920s). Discover the rich and amazing history of this classic American icon in this lesson. Then, take a short quiz to test what you learned.

Mexican War of Independence: Summary & Timeline

10. Mexican War of Independence: Summary & Timeline

The Mexican War of Independence began the ripple effect of the independence movement throughout Latin America. Learn about the causes of the war, timeline of important events, and the historical legacy of the war today.

Mexican-American War: Causes, Effects & Results

11. Mexican-American War: Causes, Effects & Results

The war with Mexico almost doubled the size of the United States, and opposition to the war demonstrated the growing sectional divide in America at the time. Explore the causes of the Mexican-American War and the effects it had on the growing nation.

The Brooklyn Bridge: Construction, History & Facts

12. The Brooklyn Bridge: Construction, History & Facts

Explore the history, construction, and significance of the Brooklyn and test your understanding about architecture and 19th-century American engineering.

What is the Panama Canal? - History, Building & Facts

13. What is the Panama Canal? - History, Building & Facts

The Panama Canal is a large canal connecting the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. It is considered a major engineering feat, but also reflects the United States's aggressive foreign policy during the early 20th century.

William Howard Taft: Biography, Facts & Quotes

14. William Howard Taft: Biography, Facts & Quotes

William Howard Taft was the 27th president of the United States (1909-1913). Notable for being the handpicked successor of Theodore Roosevelt, he is the only president to have served on the Supreme Court.

Booker T. Washington: Biography, Quotes & Accomplishments

15. Booker T. Washington: Biography, Quotes & Accomplishments

Experience the life and legacy of the famous African-American leader of post-Civil War America, Booker T. Washington. Learn about his conservative ideas on race relations and his dedicated pursuit of black economic empowerment through vocational training. Then, take the quiz for the lesson to see what you know!

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the AP US History: Tutoring Solution course

Support