Ch 31: American Reform Movements in the 1800s

About This Chapter

Teach your students about American reform movements in the 1800s with this helpful teacher resource chapter. The lessons and multiple-choice quizzes are a great way to strengthen your curriculum and engage your students.

American Reform Movements in the 1800s - Chapter Summary

In this teacher resource chapter, our professional instructors cover the American reform movements of the 1800s through a series of brief lessons. Topics covered in the lessons include the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 and the temperance and abolitionist movements. You can show an entire video lesson in class or use the timeline feature to skip to the section that you'd like your students to see. After you've shown the lessons, use our chapter test or lesson quizzes to assess student comprehension and see where additional review is needed.

How It Helps

  • Simplifies planning: By making these resources on American Reform movements in the 1800s available in one convenient location, we've taken the time and effort out of planning your curriculum and researching your lessons.
  • Encourages engagement: The videos and quizzes can be used to create discussion questions, essay prompts and homework assignments.
  • Enables customization: You're welcome to use our chapter resources as they are or modify them to suit the needs of you and your students.

Skills Covered

This chapter is designed to help you teach your students how to:

  • Outline the important reform movements of the 19th century in the U.S.
  • Detail the significance of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848
  • Identify the leaders of the temperance movement
  • Discuss key figures in the abolitionist movement

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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