Ch 6: American Revolution & the New Nation (1754-1820s)

About This Chapter

This self-paced study guide chapter helps you quickly review the history of the American Revolution and development of the United States. Inside, you'll find bite-sized lessons and quizzes that can help you review this historical era for upcoming exams, essays or homework assignments.

American Revolution & the New Nation (1754-1820s) - Chapter Summary

Work through this online history chapter at your own pace to study the American Revolution and the events that led to the creation of the United States government. These simple and fun video lessons break down important events between 1754 and the 1820s, such as Shays' Rebellion, the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution. By the end of the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Recognize the causes, events, turning points and effects of the American Revolution
  • Summarize the Northwest Ordinance and the Articles of Confederation
  • Discuss the impact of Shays' Rebellion
  • Explain the results of the Constitutional Convention
  • Analyze the U.S. Constitution's preamble, articles and Bill of Rights
  • Evaluate the Constitution's ratification and the development of the new U.S. government

When you're finished with a lesson, you'll be able to take a short quiz that reinforces important historical terms, dates, figures, etc. Take the chapter exam to ensure you've mastered these topics, and feel free to submit questions to our instructors if you need any extra help with the material. For your convenience, we've made these study resources available online around-the-clock.

8 Lessons in Chapter 6: American Revolution & the New Nation (1754-1820s)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

1. Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

In this lesson, we explore the causes and the initial battles of the American Revolution, from the end of the French and Indian War up until the Declaration of Independence in July, 1776.

Effects of the American Revolution: Summary & History

2. Effects of the American Revolution: Summary & History

In this lesson we explore the effects of the American Revolution, which were felt not just in Great Britain and North America, but across the Western world.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

3. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

4. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

5. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

6. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

7. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

8. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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