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Ch 7: America's Discovery, Colonization & Revolution

About This Chapter

The America's Discovery, Colonization & Revolution chapter of this US Citizenship Study Guide course is the most efficient way to study events and people from Pre-Columbian and early America. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you understand the essential concepts associated with the discovery and colonization of America and the American Revolution.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering early American history material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn about the discovery and colonization of America, or about the American Revolution. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the history of Native American civilizations, the original thirteen colonies, slave trade, and more
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history(visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about early American history
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How It Works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the America's Discovery, Colonization & Revolution chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the America's Discovery, Colonization & Revolution chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any early American history question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about the discovery and colonization of America and the American Revolution for a standard American citizenship course. Topics covered include:

  • Civilizations of the Americas before Columbus
  • Life in the original thirteen American colonies
  • Black history during colonial America and the rise of the slave trade
  • The motivations behind the Boston Tea Party
  • George Washington's role in the American Revolution

12 Lessons in Chapter 7: America's Discovery, Colonization & Revolution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Pre-Columbian Civilization: North American Indians Before Europeans

1. Pre-Columbian Civilization: North American Indians Before Europeans

Watch this video for an overview of the cultural groups of Native Americans as they lived at the time of first contact with Europeans. Some of these groupings, like the tribes of the plains, changed so much due to the addition of European influences, such as horses, that there is only conjecture as to how exactly they lived before European contact.

The Apache, Navajo & Mandan Civilizations

2. The Apache, Navajo & Mandan Civilizations

In this lesson, we explore three Native American tribes in, what is today, the America's Southwest and Midwest. Though all three were different cultures, they were all ultimately decimated by the same thing: contact with European settlers.

The 13 Colonies: Life in Early America

3. The 13 Colonies: Life in Early America

What was it like to live in America during the colonial period? Just like today, it depended where you were. Learn about the factors that categorized all of the American colonies, as well as the differences between the northern, middle and southern colonies.

Rise of Slave Trade: Black History in Colonial America

4. Rise of Slave Trade: Black History in Colonial America

In this lesson, you'll learn a little about the slave trade, the growth and characteristics of slavery in the colonial period - including laws regulating the institution and the population of free blacks in the English colonies.

The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

5. The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

For a thousand years, Europe had been living in the Dark Ages until a series of philosophical, religious and scientific movements helped turn on the lights. The Enlightenment began in Europe, but quickly spread throughout America in the 1700s and helped set the stage for a revolution against British rule.

Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

6. Boston Massacre: Colonists and the Declaratory and Townshend Acts

After overturning the hated Stamp Act, Parliament asserted its right to tax the colonists without representation by passing the Declaratory Act. When the Townshend Acts imposed import duties, the colonists went into action again. An escalating cycle of violence ended with the Boston Massacre, resulting in the cancellation of all duties except the one on tea.

The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

7. The Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts & First Continental Congress

Three years of calm followed the Boston Massacre and the repeal of most Townshend duties. But no sooner had Parliament passed a new tax on tea than the colonies were in an uproar again about taxation without representation. What followed were the Boston Tea Party and the fateful last steps leading to war.

Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

8. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

9. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

10. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

11. John Paul Jones and the Naval Battles of the Revolutionary War

Naval battles in the American Revolution are something of a lost chapter in history. Find out about the world's first military submarine, the privateers of the Continental Navy, and the helpful actions of three foreign allies at sea.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

12. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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