Ch 2: Analysis & Conclusions in Scientific Investigations

About This Chapter

This chapter makes the process of studying analysis and conclusions in scientific investigations fun and simple. Enjoy access to entertaining lessons, quizzes and additional tools designed to quickly and effectively boost your knowledge as you prepare for a test.

Analysis & Conclusions in Scientific Investigations - Chapter Summary

Gain greater insight into data analysis and the process of drawing conclusions based on scientific investigations. Whether you're learning how to draw logical conclusions from experimental data, evaluate scientific claims and arguments or determine whether given evidence supports a conclusion, this chapter can help! Review short lessons at your leisure. When finished, you will be able to:

  • Exhibit knowledge of data, evidence and reasoning in scientific investigations
  • Discuss the basics of analyzing scientific data
  • Explain the importance of validity and reliability in assessing the quality of a research study
  • Define and share examples of scientific explanations
  • Share best practices for presenting the scientific process orally or in writing
  • Give pros and cons of print and electronic sources for scientific research
  • Detail the importance of accuracy, reliability and validity when using scientific sources

Get started with this chapter by selecting your first lesson and reviewing its contents. Feel free to take its accompanying quiz to test your knowledge before scrolling along the right-hand sidebar to select other lessons. If you hit a snag while exploring the lessons, gain clarity by submitting your questions to our experts. Before the day of your test, find out how well you understand this chapter by taking our multiple-choice quizzes and practice exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 2: Analysis & Conclusions in Scientific Investigations
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Scientific Investigations: Data, Evidence & Reasoning

1. Scientific Investigations: Data, Evidence & Reasoning

What is a scientific investigation? And how are data, evidence, and reasoning central to the scientific process? Learn about the difference between data and evidence and why logical reasoning is just as necessary as data itself.

Scientific Data Analysis

2. Scientific Data Analysis

Science involves collecting data. But what do you do once is collected? Learn about how to analyze data, including the difference between accuracy and precision.

Validity and Reliability: How to Assess the Quality of a Research Study

3. Validity and Reliability: How to Assess the Quality of a Research Study

Many psychologists and teachers complete research studies. How can you tell if a study was done well? This lesson will cover many criteria for a good quality study, including types of reliability and validity.

Drawing Logical Conclusions from Experimental Data

4. Drawing Logical Conclusions from Experimental Data

Experimental results are what scientists like to share with each other, but it's important to understand what those data mean. We do this in the final step of the experimental process, when we draw meaningful conclusions from the results we obtained.

Scientific Explanation: Definition & Examples

5. Scientific Explanation: Definition & Examples

What makes an explanation scientific? Learn what a scientific explanation is, how it's evaluated, and some examples of scientific explanations. See how well you can explain the things you've learned with a quiz.

Understanding Whether Given Evidence Supports a Conclusion

6. Understanding Whether Given Evidence Supports a Conclusion

Part of being a good scientist is evaluating other scientists' work. One aspect of this is knowing whether the evidence provided supports the scientists' conclusions. While this is not always easy, it is necessary in order to produce good science.

How to Evaluate Scientific Claims & Arguments

7. How to Evaluate Scientific Claims & Arguments

When you hear about the new scientific discovery, how can you be sure that it's true? Learn how to evaluate scientific claims and arguments, and then test your new skills with a quiz.

Presenting the Scientific Process Orally or in Writing

8. Presenting the Scientific Process Orally or in Writing

Part of being a good scientist involves sharing your work with others. Two of the most common ways this is done is through written works and oral presentations, both of which require a certain amount of care and skill.

Print & Electronic Sources for Scientific Research

9. Print & Electronic Sources for Scientific Research

Sources provide you with helpful background information that support your own work. You can find sources both online and in printed materials. There are benefits and drawbacks to each, so you'll need to consider which is best for you and your project.

Scientific Sources: Accuracy, Reliability & Validity

10. Scientific Sources: Accuracy, Reliability & Validity

It's important to use other sources to support your work, but what's even more important is to use the right ones. Sources should be valid, reliable, and accurate, but it's not always easy to tell which ones meet these criteria.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support