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Ch 8: Analysis of Historical Documents & Nonfiction

About This Chapter

This chapter teaches high school English students how to analyze historical documents and works of nonfiction. These lessons can help students boost their grades, study for upcoming exams or earn high school English credit.

Analysis of Historical Documents & Nonfiction - Chapter Summary

This comprehensive chapter teaches students how to properly analyze works of nonfiction and important historical documents. Designed for high school English students, these lessons help them draw inferences from texts, understand organizational structure, interpret graphics and identify the implied main idea of a text. Students will also apply this knowledge by analyzing several historical texts, including the Declaration of Independence.

Students can solidify their understanding of the material by taking the self-assessment quizzes. These lessons can help a variety of students, especially those who've fallen behind in class, need extra help in English class or who want to earn high school English credit. After reviewing this chapter, students will be able to:

  • Draw inferences from informational texts
  • Understand implied main ideas
  • Identify an informational text's organizational structure
  • Interpret graphics in expository, persuasive and functional texts
  • Analyze nonfiction texts from William Bradford, Richard Wright and G.K. Chesterton, as well as the Declaration of Independence and the preamble of the U.S. Constitution

10 Lessons in Chapter 8: Analysis of Historical Documents & Nonfiction
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

1. Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

As it turns out, you may be learning more from a text than you realize. That's because in every text, some information is inferred. In this lesson, we're going to see how drawing inferences from an informational text can help us better understand it.

Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

2. Implied Main Idea: Definition & Examples

What's the point? If you're having trouble answering this question, you might need to learn more about implied main ideas. This lesson gives a definition and examples, along with explanations on how to identify them!

Identifying the Organization in a Reading Selection

3. Identifying the Organization in a Reading Selection

Nonfiction texts can be organized in a variety of ways. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to identify which organizational structure is being used in a reading selection.

Interpreting Graphics in Expository Texts

4. Interpreting Graphics in Expository Texts

Expository texts frequently use graphics to present facts and information. In this lesson, we'll discuss some ways to interpret the graphics found in expository texts.

Interpreting Graphics in Persuasive & Functional Texts

5. Interpreting Graphics in Persuasive & Functional Texts

A piece of writing may consist of much more than words. Many functional and persuasive texts also include graphics. This lesson discusses how to interpret several types of graphics.

Richard Wright's Black Boy: Summary and Analysis

6. Richard Wright's Black Boy: Summary and Analysis

After his fiction masterpiece 'Native Son,' Richard Wright wrote a deeply personal and moving autobiography, covering his childhood in the South and his life as an adult in Chicago. In this lesson, we'll explore 'Black Boy.'

William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation: Summary & Analysis

7. William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation: Summary & Analysis

In this lesson, we will learn about the work 'Of Plymouth Plantation' written by William Bradford. We will take a closer look at why the work was written, what it represents and where it is kept today for future generations to enjoy.

G. K. Chesterton' s The Fallacy of Success: Summary & Themes

8. G. K. Chesterton' s The Fallacy of Success: Summary & Themes

G. K. Chesterton's essay ''The Fallacy of Success'' attacks self-help books that claim to teach the secret to getting rich. In this lesson, you'll learn the major ideas that Chesterton uses to prove his point.

The Declaration of Independence: Summary & Analysis

9. The Declaration of Independence: Summary & Analysis

The Declaration of Independence is one of the most important documents in U.S. History and led to the country's independence from Great Britain. In this lesson, we will review the main components of this important document.

The Preamble to the Constitution: Definition, Summary, Purpose & Examples

10. The Preamble to the Constitution: Definition, Summary, Purpose & Examples

They may be the most famous 52 words in American history. Written almost as an afterthought, the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution has come to represent everything Americans think a government ought to do and ought to be.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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