Ch 23: Analyzing Expository Texts

About This Chapter

We can show you how to analyze expository texts with these lessons. You'll explore topics such as evaluating sources, organizational features, and understanding author's purpose.

Analyzing Expository Texts - Chapter Summary

Use the lessons found within this chapter to guide your review of expository texts. Lesson topics include ways that structure can affect meaning, restating ideas and summarizing, interpretation of graphics, and the use of supporting details to bolster a main point. By the end of the chapter, you'll also have reviewed the following:

  • Definition and main features of expository writing
  • How expository features are organized
  • Author's purpose and inferring intended meaning
  • Drawing conclusions from a written text
  • Structure in writing
  • Source evaluation
  • Graphics in expository texts

Our expert instructors go over each concept in entertaining but informative lessons. Test what you've covered with lesson quizzes and a chapter exam. If you find yourself stuck on a particular concept, you can submit your questions to the instructor.

10 Lessons in Chapter 23: Analyzing Expository Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Expository Writing? - Definition & Examples

1. What is Expository Writing? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will assist you in identifying and understanding the major components of expository writing. Learn more about expository writing and see some common examples. Then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Organizational Features of Expository Texts

2. Organizational Features of Expository Texts

Reading an expository text can seem like an intimidating ordeal. Read this lesson to find out how to use specific features of expository text to help you understand the material.

How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

3. How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

Understanding how to restate an idea and summarize the information you have read is an important reading skill. In this lesson, you'll learn how to rephrase the main points of an essay, argument, or reading passage into a clear summary.

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

4. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

5. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

6. Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

It's important to have information that is reliable, credible, and worthwhile in your speech. Sometimes, it's hard to determine these factors. This lesson will help you!

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

7. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

8. How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

You might be able to understand everything the author says in a passage, but can you figure out what the author ISN'T saying? Try your hand at drawing conclusions - but not jumping to conclusions - in this video lesson.

What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

9. What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

In this lesson, we will define the role of structure in literature. From there, we will look at the different ways to structure fiction and how it affects the meaning.

Interpreting Graphics in Expository Texts

10. Interpreting Graphics in Expository Texts

Expository texts frequently use graphics to present facts and information. In this lesson, we'll discuss some ways to interpret the graphics found in expository texts.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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