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Ch 4: Analyzing Literature & Informational Texts

About This Chapter

This chapter takes you into the analysis of literary texts, such as stories, and informational texts, such as articles. By completing this chapter you will be prepared to summarize, find themes, and identify relationships in types of texts.

Analyzing Literature & Informational Texts - Chapter Summary

Throughout this chapter, you can review the skills and techniques needed to identify and analyze various types of literature, including related texts and graphic information. From finding the theme of a text to identifying relationships between general and specific ideas within them, you will have a thorough review of all you need to know about literary analysis. By the end of this chapter you should be able to:

  • Explain how to infer intended meaning
  • Summarize information to demonstrate understanding
  • Define and give examples of structure in literature
  • Construct meaning in literature using words, images, and sounds
  • Discuss how supplemental features add to an informational text
  • Evaluate an author's point of view
  • Use textual evidence to interpret an informational text
  • Measure text complexity

You'll have access to the materials created by our professional instructors. It includes text and video lessons, and the all important vocabulary definitions are clearly emphasized and expressed in concise language so that your study time can be maximized. Take advantage of the self-check quizzes after each lesson to easily gauge your understanding.

13 Lessons in Chapter 4: Analyzing Literature & Informational Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

1. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

2. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Summarizing Information to Demonstrate Understanding

3. Summarizing Information to Demonstrate Understanding

How can you show you comprehend what you have read? One strategy is to summarize information. This lesson discusses three methods for summarizing that can demonstrate reading comprehension.

How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

4. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Structure in Literature: Definition & Examples

5. Structure in Literature: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will learn exactly what is meant by structure of literature. Some common methods of organization are provided. The main focus will explore the narrative structure of literature, using the popular story of Cinderella to help understand the various elements associated with this structure.

Constructing Meaning in Literature Using Words, Images & Sounds

6. Constructing Meaning in Literature Using Words, Images & Sounds

The study of visual communication considers how both images and words convey meaning in similar ways. In this lesson, you will discover strategies of visual literacy that can aid in reading comprehension, learn how images communicate meaning, and explore examples from graphic novels, painting, and literature.

How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

7. How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

In this lesson, we will learn how to tell the difference between general and specific ideas. We will also explore the relationships between these ideas and practice identifying the ideas and their relationships.

How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

8. How Supplemental Features Add to an Informational Text

Informational texts are nonfiction writings that inform the audience about a topic. To help organize these texts, supplemental features are used. These include print features, organizational aids, and visuals.

Evaluating an Author's Point of View

9. Evaluating an Author's Point of View

Two authors have differing opinions on the same topic. Which one should you believe? This lesson details several things to look for when evaluating points of view and forming your own informed decisions.

Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

10. Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

In this lesson, we will explore informational texts. Along the way, we will discover a few tips to make reading this type of text easier, and we will pay special attention to textual evidence.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

11. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

12. How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

In this lesson, we explore graphic information in texts. We will take a look at the types of graphics often seen in nonfiction, learn how to analyze them, and see how they contribute to the texts' information.

Measuring Text Complexity

13. Measuring Text Complexity

This lesson focuses on the necessary components used by educators to measure a text's level of complexity. Using a three part model, teachers across the nation are digging into what truly makes a text grade appropriate, yet rigorous, for a student to read.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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