Ch 17: Reading Strategies & Literary Analysis

About This Chapter

Find out how to analyze literature by watching video lessons and taking self-assessment quizzes. Learn to draw conclusions from a literary text and analyze plot, dialogue and characters.

Analyzing Literature - Chapter Summary

Whether you're a student or a teacher, you'll need to know how to analyze literature. Mastering the skill of literary analysis requires the ability to read beneath the surface of a text. The following video lessons can show you how to do that.

This chapter's video lessons break down the process of literary analysis into easy-to-understand components. You'll learn about different types of reading strategies. You can also explore literary elements like point of view, tone and mood. The lessons in this chapter can improve your proficiency in the following areas:

  • Employing strategies for reading and analyzing literary passages
  • Understanding characterization and point of view
  • Recognizing tone and mood in a literary passage
  • Analyzing plot and dialogue
  • Paraphrasing and drawing conclusions from a piece of writing
  • Using personal experience to gain additional insight on reading passages

Our brief, information-filled video lessons on a broad range of subjects can benefit you as a student or professional. The instructors know their subjects well, and they craft lessons that illuminate concepts using plenty of examples and visuals that bring subjects to life. Each lesson also has a transcript attached, and time tags make it easy for you to go over material from the video that you might not have grasped the first time.

13 Lessons in Chapter 17: Reading Strategies & Literary Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reading Strategies Using Visualization

1. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

2. Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

In this lesson, learn about two different approaches to reading a work of literature: big picture strategies and close reading strategies. Discover how these two perspectives can be put into practice through examples from the play 'Romeo and Juliet.'

How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

3. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Glossary of Literary Terms: Prose

4. Glossary of Literary Terms: Prose

The study of literature is a broad, diverse field. However, there's some general knowledge you should have before you dive in. Check out these terms to get a handle on the basics of prose study.

Methods of Characterization in Literature

5. Methods of Characterization in Literature

In this lesson, we'll examine five methods of characterization, including physical description, action, inner thoughts, reactions, and speech. An excerpt from a brief narrative is provided to show how authors use the various methods of characterization to develop characters and create images for the audience.

Point of View in Fiction: First Person, Third Person & More

6. Point of View in Fiction: First Person, Third Person & More

In this lesson, we will explore point of view in fiction. We will learn about several possible points of view (first person, second person, and third person) and practice identifying them.

Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

7. Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

In this lesson, we will define the literary terms tone and mood. We will then discuss how to identify each of them, as well as how to identify them in small reading passages.

Plot Analysis: Example & Overview

8. Plot Analysis: Example & Overview

In this lesson, we will learn what a plot diagram is and how it is used to analyze a story. A plot diagram helps the reader better understand the story by using an in-depth analysis.

How Dialogue Reveals Aspects of a Character

9. How Dialogue Reveals Aspects of a Character

What we choose to say when we're secretive, angry, excited, or worried helps others understand our personalities. In this lesson, we're going to analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama reveal aspects of a character.

Practice Analyzing Dialogue

10. Practice Analyzing Dialogue

Secrets, revelations, and dramatic moments often unfold through important conversations. So when we are reading a novel, short story, or play, we need to be able to analyze dialogue to understand its purpose and importance.

How to Paraphrase: Definition & Examples

11. How to Paraphrase: Definition & Examples

Find out what it means to paraphrase, what the benefits are, and how paraphrasing is different from other ways to cite sources. You will also see examples of the ways paraphrasing can be used.

Comparing Texts to Personal Experience

12. Comparing Texts to Personal Experience

Each reader brings individual opinions, beliefs, and experiences to the reading of a text. Understanding this dynamic can help you enjoy and learn from the books you read.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

13. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support