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Ch 24: AP Biology - Animal Behavior: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Animal Behavior unit of this AP Biology Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about types of animal behavior. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our AP Biology Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about social and learned behaviors in animals. There is no faster or easier way to learn about animal behavior. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about innate behaviors, habituation, kin selection and altruism.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need a biology curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and an Animal Behavior unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Animal Behavior Unit Objectives:

  • Learn about animal reflexes and kineses.
  • Discuss classical and operant conditioning.
  • Study the costs and benefits of social groups.
  • Discuss territorial and agonistic behaviors.
  • Explore the queen/worker relationship.
  • Explain the theory of demographic transition.
  • Learn about carrying capacity.
  • Study biological clocks and circadian rhythm.
  • Discuss visual, auditory and chemical communication signals.

9 Lessons in Chapter 24: AP Biology - Animal Behavior: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Innate Behavior: Reflexes, Kineses and Taxes

1. Innate Behavior: Reflexes, Kineses and Taxes

When there is a loud sound, you quickly jump without thinking. This is because this reflex is an innate, or inherited, behavior. In this lesson, we will look at reflexes as well as several other types of innate behaviors.

Learned Behavior: Imprinting, Habituation and Conditioning

2. Learned Behavior: Imprinting, Habituation and Conditioning

Ever wonder why it is easier to train your dog when you give him a treat every time he does something correct? In this lesson we will take a look at conditioning as well as several other forms of learned behavior.

Social Behavior: The Cost-Benefit of Altruism and Kin Selection

3. Social Behavior: The Cost-Benefit of Altruism and Kin Selection

Ever wonder why people are more likely to help their relatives than complete strangers? Social behavior can help explain this and other actions. Let's look at the cost of certain behaviors.

Social Behavior: Agonistic, Dominance Hierarchies, & Territoriality

4. Social Behavior: Agonistic, Dominance Hierarchies, & Territoriality

Instead of using words, animals communicate with each other through social behaviors. These actions between individuals may be used to establish rank, defend home and breeding sites, and compete for resources.

Social Systems vs. Individual Fitness: The Queen/Worker Relationship

5. Social Systems vs. Individual Fitness: The Queen/Worker Relationship

The queen bee rules her hive while others take care of her needs. This form of behavior may seem odd, but it can be explained by looking into social systems and fitness.

The Theory of Demographic Transition: Overview

6. The Theory of Demographic Transition: Overview

Populations change over time. The growth or decline of a population can have an effect on the quality of life for people within that population. In this lesson, you'll learn about the theory of demographic transition, which is a model used to study and predict population changes.

Carrying Capacity of a Population: Effect of Biomedical Progress

7. Carrying Capacity of a Population: Effect of Biomedical Progress

The human population continues to grow. There are several things that contribute to this growth, including biomedical progress. In this lesson, we will look at some examples as well as what may happen if this growth continues.

The Circadian Rhythm

8. The Circadian Rhythm

You wake up in the morning and go to sleep at night. But some animals do the opposite: wake at night and sleep during the day. What determines the time of day you're active is your circadian rhythm, an internal clock that keeps daily time for you.

How Animals Communicate: Chemical, Visual & Electrical Signals

9. How Animals Communicate: Chemical, Visual & Electrical Signals

Animals use a variety of different signals to communicate with each other. In this lesson you'll identify the different types of communication signals and the situations in which they might be most useful.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the AP Biology: Homeschool Curriculum course

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