Ch 17: AP Biology - Plant Biology: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Plant Biology unit of this AP Biology Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about the components of plants and flowers. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our AP Biology Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the classification and development of plants. There is no faster or easier way to learn about plant biology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about the plant shoot system, plant structures, flowers and pollination.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need a biology curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a plant biology unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Plant Biology Unit Objectives:

  • Explore the differences between vascular and non-vascular plants.
  • Discuss vascular tissue's arrangement in the stems of plants.
  • Explain the process of primary growth.
  • Learn the functions of cork and vascular cambium in secondary growth.
  • Study the characteristics of the stomata and the spongy layer.
  • Discuss the function of root hairs.
  • Explore primary and lateral root growth.
  • Discover why nitrogen is important to plants.
  • Learn about the effects of transpiration on xylem.
  • Read about the purpose of sieve plates, sieve tubes and sieve cells.
  • Explore different flowers and their parts.
  • Discuss the processes of fertilization and pollination.

12 Lessons in Chapter 17: AP Biology - Plant Biology: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Classification of Vascular, Nonvascular, Monocot & Dicot Plants

1. Classification of Vascular, Nonvascular, Monocot & Dicot Plants

Plants may not seem like the most interesting things around, but they are definitely useful. In this lesson, we will explore the basic classification of plants and the unique characteristics of each group.

Structure of Plant Stems: Vascular and Ground Tissue

2. Structure of Plant Stems: Vascular and Ground Tissue

You can determine the age of a tree by looking at its rings. In this lesson, we will look at the basic structures of stems and explore what causes the rings in a tree trunk.

Apical Meristem & Primary Shoot System Growth

3. Apical Meristem & Primary Shoot System Growth

Just like humans, plants need to grow. In this lesson, you'll see how plant growth occurs at specific locations and how the height of the plant is increased.

Lateral Meristem & Secondary Shoot System Growth

4. Lateral Meristem & Secondary Shoot System Growth

Why do some plants experience a secondary growth? Why do some plants grow only in height but others grow in height and width? Discover the answers to these questions in this lesson.

Structure of Leaves: The Epidermis, Palisade and Spongy Layers

5. Structure of Leaves: The Epidermis, Palisade and Spongy Layers

Leaves may look pretty in the fall when they are changing colors, but they also provide many necessary functions for plants. In this lesson, we will explore the structures and functions of leaves.

Primary Root Tissue, Root Hairs and the Plant Vascular Cylinder

6. Primary Root Tissue, Root Hairs and the Plant Vascular Cylinder

Roots of plants can provide support, food and water. We will look at diagrams and photos to see the different parts of roots in order to explain these different functions.

Root System Growth: The Root Cap, Primary Roots & Lateral Roots

7. Root System Growth: The Root Cap, Primary Roots & Lateral Roots

It is easy to see some plants get taller, but it is important to know that plants must also have a strong support that we cannot always see. Root growth helps plants survive and can happen in two ways.

Nitrogen Fixation: Significance to Plants and Humans

8. Nitrogen Fixation: Significance to Plants and Humans

Almost 80% of our atmosphere is nitrogen, but we can't use it. We will look at how this unusable nitrogen is converted into a form we can use and why nitrogen is important to plants and humans.

Xylem: The Effect of Transpiration and Cohesion on Function

9. Xylem: The Effect of Transpiration and Cohesion on Function

Roots absorb water and leaves release water, but how does water move up a plant? In this lesson, we will look at how this happens in vascular plants, including the importance of xylem, cohesion and transpiration in the process.

Phloem: The Pressure Flow Hypothesis of Food Movement

10. Phloem: The Pressure Flow Hypothesis of Food Movement

Leaves produce sugars and stems; roots and fruits use these sugars for energy. In this lesson, we will look at how these sugars move throughout vascular plants, including the importance of phloem and the pressure flow hypothesis in the process.

Flowers: Structure and Function of Male & Female Components

11. Flowers: Structure and Function of Male & Female Components

In this lesson, we'll look at the parts of a flower and learn their functions. These natural beauties provide indispensable services to the plants they adorn.

Methods of Pollination and Flower-Pollinator Relationships

12. Methods of Pollination and Flower-Pollinator Relationships

Ever wonder why bees are attracted to specific flowers? We will look at why certain animals are drawn to certain plants and other methods of pollination in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the AP Biology: Homeschool Curriculum course

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