Ch 22: AP Biology: The Nervous, Immune, and Endocrine Systems

About This Chapter

Prepare for the AP Biology Exam by learning about the nervous, immune, and endocrine system. Each short video lesson has a full transcript and multiple choice quiz.

AP Biology: The Nervous, Immune and Endocrine Systems - Chapter Summary

Learn the ins and outs of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems with fun and engaging video lessons in this this chapter. Each lesson brings the system and its structures and functions to life with animated graphics, relatable examples, and simple explanations. Once you complete this chapter, you will be prepared to do the following on the AP Biology exam:

  • Describe homeostasis and its relation to temperature and hormonal control
  • Identify the structure and function of neurons in the nervous system
  • Examine the central, peripheral, sympathetic, and parasympathetic nervous systems
  • Explore brain structures and functions
  • Define innate immunity and the role of inflammation, neutrophils and natural killer cells
  • Discuss how T Cells, B Cells and antibodies influence acquired immunity
  • Explain the immune system, disease, cell communication and the role of antibiotics and vaccines
  • Examine flu viruses, HIV and immune system evasion
  • Outline pathogens and antibiotic resistance
  • Summarize cell communication and the immune system
  • Examine the features of cell-mediated and humoral immune response

16 Lessons in Chapter 22: AP Biology: The Nervous, Immune, and Endocrine Systems
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Homeostasis and Temperature Regulation in Humans

1. Homeostasis and Temperature Regulation in Humans

Humans, as well as other mammals and birds, need a stable body temperature. Learn how temperature is regulated in humans by exploring homeostasis, thermoregulation, and hypothalamus, and also understand the difference between endotherms and ectotherms.

Homeostasis of Glucose Levels: Hormonal Control and Diabetes

2. Homeostasis of Glucose Levels: Hormonal Control and Diabetes

The human body uses hormones as regulators of glucose levels leading to a state of homeostasis. Learn about the homeostasis of glucose and how hormones control blood sugar levels to prevent diabetes.

Functions of the Nervous System

3. Functions of the Nervous System

The nervous system helps animals interact with their respective environments. Learn more about how the nervous system functions to collect input from the body's senses and external environment, processes and interprets sensory input, and responds appropriately to the sensory input.

The Structure and Function of Neurons

4. The Structure and Function of Neurons

The structure of neurons contains two main components, dendrites and axons, that polarize and depolarize cells. Those two components are responsible for the function of sending signals among cells. This lesson extrapolates on those elements, in addition to synapses, and it also explores polarization and depolarization processes.

The Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

5. The Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system is composed of the sensory and motor neurons of the body. Discover how sensory neurons, such as photoreceptors and thermoreceptors, collect sensory input and sent it to the brain, as well as how motor neurons transmit signals to responsive tissues to appropriately respond to a situation.

The Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Nervous Systems

6. The Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Nervous Systems

The sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems are both parts of the autonomic nervous system, and even though they are in charge of the same body functions, they make opposite things. Learn about the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and discover for which activities, in particular, are activated.

Brain Structures and Functions Part I

7. Brain Structures and Functions Part I

The structure of the brain is composed of different parts, such as the brain stem, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and many others. Learn about the different structures of the brain and each of their specific functions.

The Cerebral Cortex: Brain Structures and Functions Part II

8. The Cerebral Cortex: Brain Structures and Functions Part II

The human brain has four lobes that coordinate to enable individuals to function as whole persons with emotions, motor functions, sensory perceptions, and the ability to learn and interact with others. Learn about the cerebral cortex, brain structures, and functions. Explore the four lobes--temporal, frontal, parietal, and occipital--and understand what each lobe does and how it works.

Cell Communication & the Immune System

9. Cell Communication & the Immune System

In this lesson, we'll be exploring the cellular communication that happens when you get sick. You'll understand what cells are involved in an immune response and how they coordinate their attack on pathogens in your body.

Cell-Mediated Immune Response: Definition, Steps & Features

10. Cell-Mediated Immune Response: Definition, Steps & Features

Cell-mediated immune response involves steps of identification and destruction of harmful bacteria or viruses to prevent further infection. See how T cells operate, noting the different types and functions that they perform in immune response.

The Humoral Immune Response: Definition and Features

11. The Humoral Immune Response: Definition and Features

The body's humoral immune response is designed to protect it from bacteria that cause infections. Learn about the definition of the humoral immune response and explore its features, including antigen presenting cells, B cells, and plasma cells. Understand how the humoral immune response helps defend the body from disease by engulfing and breaking down pathogens.

Innate Immunity: Inflammation, Neutrophils & Natural Killer Cells

12. Innate Immunity: Inflammation, Neutrophils & Natural Killer Cells

The innate immune system builds a defense against dangerous pathogens and other foreign invaders of the body. Explore the innate immune system and discover the functions of various immune cells, like neutrophils, which are the first immune cells to respond to wounds.

Acquired Immunity: T Cells, B Cells and Antibodies

13. Acquired Immunity: T Cells, B Cells and Antibodies

People who have acquired immunity against an illness cannot be infected with it again. Discover how T cells, B cells, and antibodies work together to fight illnesses in this lesson.

Antibiotics and Vaccines

14. Antibiotics and Vaccines

Antibiotics and vaccines have a great contribution to the increase in life expectancy over time. Learn more about the history of antibiotics and vaccines, and how different types of vaccines are developed.

Flu Viruses, HIV and Immune System Evasion

15. Flu Viruses, HIV and Immune System Evasion

Some viruses, such as influenza and HIV, continue to spread and infect despite the human immune system. Understand characteristics of these viruses, such as rapid or high mutation rates, and how they help in evading the human body's protections.

Pathogens: Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence

16. Pathogens: Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence

Antibiotic resistance comes about when a disease causing microbe evolves to hold out against the effects of medications due to overuse. Study antibiotic resistance, its dangers, virulence, factors of virulence, and how virulence specificity is beneficial.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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