Ch 9: AP English - American Literary Periods and Movements: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The American Literary Periods and Movements chapter of this AP English Literature Help and Review course is the simplest way to master American literary periods and movements. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of American literary periods and movements.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help understanding AP English literature material will benefit from taking this course. You will be able to grasp the subject matter faster, retain critical knowledge longer and earn better grades. You're in the right place if you:

  • Have fallen behind in understanding the Romantic period or working with contemporary American literature.
  • Need an efficient way to learn about American literary periods and movements.
  • Learn best with engaging auditory and visual tools.
  • Struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD.
  • Experience difficulty understanding your teachers.
  • Missed class time and need to catch up.
  • Can't access extra English learning resources at school.

How it works:

  • Start at the beginning, or identify the topics that you need help with.
  • Watch and learn from fun videos, reviewing as needed.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Submit questions to one of our instructors for personalized support if you need extra help.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the American Literary Periods and Movements chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the American Literary Periods and Movements chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any relevant question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to questions including:

  • What was unique to Native American and colonial literature during the 17th and 18th centuries?
  • How did imagination, individualism and intuition characterize the Romantic period?
  • What is transcendentalism, and how did it impact 19th-century American literature?
  • How did romanticism give birth to literary realism?
  • How did literary literary naturalists write about humans and nature?
  • What authors and themes were associated with the Harlem Renaissance?
  • How did American culture and history impact contemporary American literature?

21 Lessons in Chapter 9: AP English - American Literary Periods and Movements: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Native American and Colonial Literature

1. Native American and Colonial Literature

What types of writing were popular during the early days of the United States? In this lesson, we'll look at three major categories of 17th and 18th century American writing in more detail: Native American oral stories, Puritan writing, and early American political writing.

The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

2. The Romantic Period in American Literature and Art

This video introduces American Romanticism, a movement where literature focused on intuition, imagination and individualism. Authors such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow contributed to what became known as the American identity, as the new country did its best to distance itself from European tradition.

The Dark Romantics in American Literature

3. The Dark Romantics in American Literature

This video introduces the characteristics of Dark Romanticism, a movement at the end of the Romantic period where literature embodied creepy symbols, horrific themes, and explored the psychological effects of guilt and sin. Authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, wrote short stories, poems, and novels that encouraged Americans to see evil in everything.

Transcendentalism: Impact on American Literature

4. Transcendentalism: Impact on American Literature

This video defines Transcendentalism, a literary movement of the mid-19th century. Authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman used their literary platforms to encourage Americans to transcend society's presumptions and create a personal, progressive relationship with spirituality and nature.

The Literary Realism Movement: A Response to Romanticism

5. The Literary Realism Movement: A Response to Romanticism

In this lesson, we will learn about Realism in American literature, how this new literary movement grew out of Romanticism and what circumstances in our changing nation made that literary shift possible.

Naturalism in Literature: Authors and Characteristics

6. Naturalism in Literature: Authors and Characteristics

Nature is indifferent; humans are just animals. So it goes in naturalism. In this lesson, we'll explore this literary movement. Authors discussed include Stephen Crane, Jack London and Theodore Dreiser.

Modernism in American Literature

7. Modernism in American Literature

In this lesson, we will discuss the concept of literary modernism in the United States. We will explore its historical backdrop along with the very unique characteristics and authors that define American modernism which lasted from 1914-1945.

The Imagist Movement: Poems, Examples & Key Poets

8. The Imagist Movement: Poems, Examples & Key Poets

The Imagist movement in modern poetry focused on describing objects as opposed to the long philosophical discussions of traditional poetry. Read on to find out more about Imagism and read poems by two of its founders, H.D. and Amy Lowell.

The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

9. The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

The Harlem Renaissance was a movement in the 1920s and 1930s during which there was an explosion of African-American art and literature. This lesson looks at the themes, causes, and important figures of the Harlem Renaissance.

The Contemporary Period in American Literature

10. The Contemporary Period in American Literature

Learn about how Contemporary literature developed and understand its fundamental characteristics. Find out how American history and cultural norms really defined and developed the Contemporary period in American literature.

Contemporary American Literature: Authors and Major Works

11. Contemporary American Literature: Authors and Major Works

This lesson helps you decipher pieces of contemporary American literature by looking at famous examples from some of the greatest authors of the time.

Carl Sandburg: Biography, Famous Poems, Books & Facts

12. Carl Sandburg: Biography, Famous Poems, Books & Facts

Carl Sandburg was a prolific writer whose Bohemian background prepared him to be a very versatile writer. In this lesson, you will learn about Carl Sandburg and discover why he is still one of the world's most well-known poets.

Detective Fiction: Definition, History & Authors

13. Detective Fiction: Definition, History & Authors

In this lesson, we will define detective fiction and its characteristics, examine the history of this genre, and look at some of the major authors. We will also discuss how the genre, though still popular, has changed today.

Diana Gabaldon: Biography & Books

14. Diana Gabaldon: Biography & Books

This lesson provides some insight into the life of the author Diana Gabaldon, and her most popular series ''Outlander'' will be discussed. Read the lesson, then test yourself with a quiz!

Edwin Markham: Biography & Poems

15. Edwin Markham: Biography & Poems

Edwin Markham was a poet of the people. His attitudes were socially progressive, and his work gave voice to the suffering and concerns of laborers. Read on to learn about Markham's life and his poetry.

Edna Ferber: Biography & Books

16. Edna Ferber: Biography & Books

A Pulitzer, a membership in the exclusive Algonquin Round Table and a book turned into a popular musical - these are the hallmarks of Edna Ferber's life and career. In this lesson, we'll learn more about her.

Summary of Show Boat by Edna Ferber

17. Summary of Show Boat by Edna Ferber

Edna Ferber's 1926 novel 'Showboat' tells the story of three generations of performers on a Mississippi riverboat. The novel was the basis for a Broadway musical adaptation and three film versions depicting this colorful time period in American history.

Summary of Giant by Edna Ferber

18. Summary of Giant by Edna Ferber

'Giant' by Edna Ferber is a novel about the life of Texans from 1925 until 1950. When the novel hit stands in 1952, scandal erupted as the people of Texas rebuked this book that criticized the sacred rituals that many Texans reveled in. Discover why 'Giant' was a novel that left people talking.

Stage Door: Book Summary & Plot

19. Stage Door: Book Summary & Plot

The play 'Stage Door' was co-wrriten by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman, and made its stage debut in 1936. The story centers around a boarding house for aspiring actresses in New York City.

So Big by Edna Ferber: Summary & Analysis

20. So Big by Edna Ferber: Summary & Analysis

''So Big'' is a Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Edna Ferber published in 1924. This lesson will provide a brief summary of the plot and look at some of the analytical themes and issues Ferber addresses.

Synopsis of Ice Palace by Edna Ferber

21. Synopsis of Ice Palace by Edna Ferber

Edna Ferber's 1958 novel ''Ice Palace'' is a pro-statehood commentary on the value of Alaska to the United States. At the time that Alaska became a state, most US citizens knew very little about the great northern wilderness.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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