Ch 7: AP English - Essay Basics - Conventions in Essay Writing: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Essay Basics - Conventions in Essay Writing chapter of this AP English Help and Review course is the simplest way to master essay basics and writing conventions. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of conventions in essay writing.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering AP English material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn AP English. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding essay focus or methods for responding to an essay prompt
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning English (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about essay writing conventions
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra English learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Essay Basics - Conventions in Essay Writing chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Essay Basics - Conventions in Essay Writing chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any writing conventions question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an essay basics and writing conventions unit of a standard AP English course. Topics covered include:

  • Writing for the intended audience
  • Developing style, tone and point-of-view through good diction
  • Using idioms and phrasal verbs
  • Identifying active and passive voice
  • Understanding sentence structure
  • Writing logical sentences
  • Writing a great argument
  • Structuring sentences and paragraphs in essays
  • Using logos, ethos and pathos
  • Using sources and evaluating evidence

23 Lessons in Chapter 7: AP English - Essay Basics - Conventions in Essay Writing: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

1. How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

In this video, learn how to ensure that your writing responds directly to your assignment. Then find out how to spot where you may have strayed from the paper's point and how to get back on track.

Writing for Your Audience

2. Writing for Your Audience

By understanding some fundamental characteristics about your audience, you can write more effectively and be in better control of how well your writing is received by that audience. This video explains the basic points that you should consider in order to provide more informative and more persuasive essays for your readers.

How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

3. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

There are three types of appeals that you can use in your persuasive writing to make your arguments more effective. In this video, you'll learn about logical, ethical, and emotional appeals as well as how to use them.

How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

4. How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

Developing a good writing style starts with developing good diction. You can't craft an essay or story the way you want without being able to choose the right words first. Here's how.

How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

5. How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

From great ideas to great execution, learn what makes writing 'good' and how to transform your writing from 'okay' to accomplished through the use of specific examples, great ideas, and organization.

How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

6. How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify idioms and phrasal verbs. Once you can recognize these parts of speech, you will be able to use them yourself in your writing.

Active and Passive Voice

7. Active and Passive Voice

You may have heard your teachers toss around the terms 'passive voice' and 'active voice'. But if you've never really understood what it means to write actively or passively, stick with us -- and learn how to turn to awkward passive sentences into bright, active ones.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

8. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

9. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

10. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

11. How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

Sometimes we know what we want to write, but we are just unsure of the best way to write it. In this video, we will cover ways to structure sentences in an essay.

How to Structure Paragraphs in an Essay

12. How to Structure Paragraphs in an Essay

When structuring a paragraph, you shouldn't just go throwing together a few sentences. The sentences that make up a paragraph should all flow together and represent the same topic to make up a strong paragraph. This video explains how to put together your sentences and paragraphs to maximize their impact.

How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

13. How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

Often times in writing, we know what we want to say, but it doesn't seem to come out right. In this video we will learn the steps needed to improve your writing with better sentence structure.

How to Write a Great Argument

14. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

15. Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

In this video, you will explore the basics of identifying your purpose and audience and learn how to use effective rhetorical skills in your persuasive writing.

How Word Choice and Language Sets the Tone of Your Essay

16. How Word Choice and Language Sets the Tone of Your Essay

In this video, we will discuss how word choice sets the tone for your essay. This includes letting the reader know if you are angry, happy or even attempting to refrain from bias. These tools bring your 'voice' into your writing.

Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

17. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

Appeal is an important aspect to writing, especially when your goal is to inform and/or persuade the reader in some area. In this lesson, we will examine the three main types of appeal: logos, ethos and pathos

How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

18. How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

When writing an essay, you will often be asked to utilize appropriate sources for evidence, including facts and definitions. In this video, we will talk about the ways we can utilize and evaluate sources and evidence.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

19. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

Attention Getters for Essays: Types & Examples

20. Attention Getters for Essays: Types & Examples

Let's learn about attention getters and why they are important in academic essays. We'll learn about several types of attention getters and review some examples.

Exemplification Essay: Definition & Examples

21. Exemplification Essay: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will explore the components of the exemplification essay and how it uses specific examples in order to try and convince your audience that your side is the right side.

Secondary Source: Definition & Examples

22. Secondary Source: Definition & Examples

What are secondary sources? Read this lesson to learn about these materials. You'll also find out how to determine whether or not a source is secondary.

Citing an Online Newspaper Article

23. Citing an Online Newspaper Article

You might one day find yourself needing to cite an online newspaper article. In this lesson, we'll learn what should be included in this citation and the formats of different style manuals. Finally, we'll look at some examples of online newspaper article citations according to three style manuals.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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