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Ch 17: AP European History - World War I: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The World War I chapter of this AP European History Homework Help course helps students complete their World War I homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your World War I homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your World War I homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Political and social tensions in Europe
  • Powder keg of Europe during World War I
  • Triple Alliance and Triple Entente
  • Factors that led to World War I
  • Treaty of Versailles and League of Nations

9 Lessons in Chapter 17: AP European History - World War I: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Tensions in Europe: Political, Social & Entangling Alliances

1. Tensions in Europe: Political, Social & Entangling Alliances

In this lesson, we will study the tensions in Europe that led up to World War I. We will take a look at the nations involved, the alliances they made, the ideas they embraced, and the conflicts they fought.

The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

2. The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

In this lesson, we will explore the way in which Europe was a sort of 'powder keg' in the years leading up to World War I. We will examine the sources of tension among the European powers and explore how these played a role in the outbreak of World War I.

Triple Alliance and Triple Entente in Europe on the Eve of World War I

3. Triple Alliance and Triple Entente in Europe on the Eve of World War I

In this lesson, we will take a close look at the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente that were in effect on the eve of World War I. We will examine the rise of the alliances and learn about the countries that created them.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

4. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

5. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

WWI Deaths and Casualties

6. WWI Deaths and Casualties

World War I was one of the most horrendous conflicts known to humanity. However, it wasn't just the body count that made the conflict so frightening. For the first time in history, battle deaths were the majority of losses.

WWI Propaganda: Posters and Other Techniques

7. WWI Propaganda: Posters and Other Techniques

In this lesson we will examine World War I propaganda. We will analyze the messages and themes contained in World War I posters, as well as other forms of propaganda.

WWI Chemical Warfare: Poison Gas & Gas Masks

8. WWI Chemical Warfare: Poison Gas & Gas Masks

In this lesson we will learn about chemical warfare during World War I. We will explore how poison gas was used, how effective it was in battle, and what measures were used to combat it.

WWI Alliances & the Alliance System

9. WWI Alliances & the Alliance System

In this lesson, we'll take a look at how the dominoes fell to start World War I in a matter of weeks. We'll look at the motivations of the major players and how quickly the conflict all happened.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the AP European History: Homework Help Resource course

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