Ch 18: AP Physics 2: Conservation of Linear Momentum

About This Chapter

Fully understand the conservation of linear momentum with the helpful tools in this informative chapter. These easy-to-follow text and video lessons cover this topic and more and serve as a comprehensive study guide you can access to prepare for an exam, class project or discussion.

AP Physics 2: Conservation of Linear Momentum - Chapter Summary

Our instructors present the conservation of linear momentum and other physics topics, including elastic and inelastic collisions and common final velocity, in this engaging chapter. You don't have to be intimidated by challenging subjects with these self-paced and professionally written lessons. Review the material as many times as you need to, and then take the multiple-choice quizzes to make sure you understand before moving on. If at any time you get stuck when working through the chapter, feel free to contact one of our instructors for help. Once you complete these lessons, you should be ready to:

  • Give the formula for conservation of linear momentum
  • Define isolated systems as they're used in physics
  • Detail the principles associated with elastic and inelastic collisions
  • Analyze inelastic and elastic collisions
  • Describe conservation of kinetic energy
  • Determine common final velocity in inelastic collisions
  • Explain conservation of momentum in 1-D and 2-D systems

7 Lessons in Chapter 18: AP Physics 2: Conservation of Linear Momentum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

1. Conservation of Linear Momentum: Formula and Examples

The law of conservation of momentum tells us that the amount of momentum for a system doesn't change. In this lesson, we'll explore how that can be true even when the momenta of the individual components does change.

Isolated Systems in Physics: Definition and Examples

2. Isolated Systems in Physics: Definition and Examples

Systems are important to understand when studying physics, but they are not always easy to describe. In this video lesson, you'll identify isolated systems and understand what makes them unique.

Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

3. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions: Difference and Principles

When objects come in contact with each other, a collision occurs. In this lesson, you'll learn about the two types of collisions as well as how momentum is conserved in each.

Analyzing Elastic & Inelastic Collisions

4. Analyzing Elastic & Inelastic Collisions

In this lesson, you'll have the chance to explore the differences between elastic and inelastic collisions, and use that knowledge to solve problems. Lesson topics will include equations and theories related to momentum.

Conservation of Kinetic Energy

5. Conservation of Kinetic Energy

Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. In this lesson we will investigate how kinetic energy is sometimes conserved and sometimes not conserved based on the type of collisions between masses.

Common Final Velocity in Inelastic Collisions

6. Common Final Velocity in Inelastic Collisions

When two objects collide and stick together, this is called an inelastic collision. In this lesson, learn how to recognize inelastic collisions and how to use conservation of momentum to find the common final velocity.

Conservation of Momentum in 1-D & 2-D Systems

7. Conservation of Momentum in 1-D & 2-D Systems

Momentum is the resistance to the change in velocity, and momentum is always conserved in any collision or explosion. This lesson will explore the conservation of momentum for multiple masses colliding in one and two dimensions, and for a single mass exploding.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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