Ch 8: AP Psychology: Memory & Cognition Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Memory and Cognition chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach how memory, language and sensory skills develop and function in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Memory and Cognition chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

DayTopicsKey Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Cognition
Language
Language acquisition
Definition of cognition, inductive and deductive reasoning, heuristics
Definition of language, combinability, phoneme, semantics
How humans learn to speak and understand language, universal grammar, Broca's area, steps in learning language as a baby
Tuesday Information processing
Categorizing memory
Attention and top-down vs. bottom-up processing
Three processes of memory, short-term and long-term memory
Types of memories, including explicit memories, implicit memories and procedural memories, examples of categories of memories
How humans use their cognitive resources to focus, two methods of paying attention, selective attention
Wednesday Perceptual development
Improving short-term memory
Improving long-term memory
How the five senses develop in infants and children
How short-term memory functions, tips for improving it
How long-term memory functions, tips for improving it, such as mnemonic devices and spaced repetition
Thursday Memory distortion
Heuristics
How false memories occur, misinformation effect, schema, source amnesia
Definition of heuristic, availability heuristic, representativeness heuristic, base-rate heuristic
Friday Using concepts to classify the world
Types of concepts
Definition of concepts, how they are made, prototype, typicality
Superordinate, basic and subordinate concepts

15 Lessons in Chapter 8: AP Psychology: Memory & Cognition Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Cognition?

1. What is Cognition?

People think in different ways, and thoughts are an important part of who you are. In this lesson, we'll look at cognition, including two common types of cognition: reasoning and heuristics.

What Is Language?

2. What Is Language?

Have you ever wondered how human language is constructed to form meaning? Why is language more complex than animal calls? In this lesson, we'll take a look at the basic units language and learn how meaning is formed.

Language Acquisition: Definition, Theories & Stages

3. Language Acquisition: Definition, Theories & Stages

Have you ever wondered how humans are able to learn, process, comprehend and speak a language? In this lesson on language acquisition, we'll take a look at some distinctions between languages and learn how babies come to understand and speak a language.

Information Processing: Encoding, Storage & Retrieval

4. Information Processing: Encoding, Storage & Retrieval

How does your brain remember information and recall it later? In this lesson, you'll look at the steps your brain takes as it processes data from short-term memory and stores it as long-term memory.

Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

5. Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

Did you know that there are several types of memories? How does your brain keep track of them all? In this lesson, as you observe your surroundings at an art museum, you'll come to understand how your brain categorizes memory so you can remember your experiences.

Attention and Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up Processing

6. Attention and Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up Processing

Are you a big-picture person or do you get caught up in the details? Explore two ways that you can use your cognitive resources to focus your attention. This lesson provides both the details and the big picture for top-down and bottom-up processing.

Perceptual Development in Infants

7. Perceptual Development in Infants

Why are some senses more developed than others for a newborn? You'll learn which senses are initially important for infants to bond with and recognize their mothers and which one is still in development after birth.

George Miller's Psychological Study to Improve Short-Term Memory

8. George Miller's Psychological Study to Improve Short-Term Memory

Wouldn't it be nice to improve your short-term memory? According to one psychological study, there are, in fact, ways you can organize sets of new information to make them easier to remember. Based on the study, this lesson examines a method that can increase your short-term memory.

Using Psychology to Improve Long-Term Memory

9. Using Psychology to Improve Long-Term Memory

What are some tips for improving your memory? This memorable lesson on memory covers self-referencing, mnemonic devices, spaced repetition and rehearsal. You won't want to cram for exams once you learn these better ways to improve your long-term memory!

Memory Distortion: Source Amnesia, Misinformation Effect & Choice-Supportive Bias

10. Memory Distortion: Source Amnesia, Misinformation Effect & Choice-Supportive Bias

With all the information we learn and process every day, it can be difficult to remember things accurately. Because of this, our memory can become distorted. In this lesson, we'll learn how our brain can trick us into falsely remembering details of our past experiences.

Types of Heuristics: Availability, Representativeness & Base-Rate

11. Types of Heuristics: Availability, Representativeness & Base-Rate

Did you know that our brain uses strategies to process information and draw conclusions? Although we're able to reach conclusions through these mental strategies, sometimes, our reasoning can be off. Read on to discover how our brain draws these conclusions and why they can be wrong.

Using Concepts to Classify the World

12. Using Concepts to Classify the World

What has wings, feathers, and lives in a nest? That's not a riddle; it's a concept. Watch this lesson to find out more about what concepts are, what a prototype is, and how typicality influences the way you think about the world.

Types of Concepts: Superordinate, Subordinate, and Basic

13. Types of Concepts: Superordinate, Subordinate, and Basic

When I say 'home,' what do you picture? Mansion, apartment, or shack? Home, like many other things, is a concept. In this lesson, we'll explore what a concept is and the three general levels of concepts: superordinate, basic, and subordinate.

Proactive Interference: Definition & Examples

14. Proactive Interference: Definition & Examples

Sometimes it is difficult to remember a particular thing. It becomes easy to jumble up things or mistake one thing for another when they are studied together. It seems like the ideas jump in front of each other.

Retroactive Interference: Definition & Examples

15. Retroactive Interference: Definition & Examples

Retroactive interference occurs when newly acquired information causes us to have trouble remembering old information. Learn more about retroactive interference from examples and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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