Login

Ch 9: Applied Social Psychology: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Applied Social Psychology chapter of this Social Psychology Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the application of social psychology in real life. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of applied social psychology.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering social psychology material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn social psychology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding prosocial behavior and applications for social psychology
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning psychology (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about applied social psychology
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra psychology learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the applied social psychology chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the applied social psychology chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any applied social psychology question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an applied social psychology unit of a standard social psychology course. Topics covered include:

  • Altruism and prosocial behavior
  • The bystander effect
  • The deterrence theory of punishment
  • Emotional and instrumental support during stress
  • False confessions and recovered memories
  • Seligman's theory of learned helplessness

49 Lessons in Chapter 9: Applied Social Psychology: Help and Review
Altruism and Prosocial Behavior: Definition & Predictors

1. Altruism and Prosocial Behavior: Definition & Predictors

Prosocial behavior is any action intended to help others. One motivation for prosocial behavior is altruism, or the desire to help others with no expectation of reward. In this lesson, we explore prosocial behavior and the elements that social psychologists have identified as predicting it.

Prosocial Behavior: How Gender and Culture Predict Helping

2. Prosocial Behavior: How Gender and Culture Predict Helping

Social psychologists have found that both gender and culture help to predict people's prosocial behavior. In this lesson, we look at both of these factors and how they affect helping behaviors.

How Positive Moods and Negative State Relief Affect Prosocial Behavior

3. How Positive Moods and Negative State Relief Affect Prosocial Behavior

Your mood, good or bad, affects whether you are willing to engage in prosocial behavior. In this lesson, we look at how and why mood can determine whether people help others.

Defining the Bystander Effect: Kitty Genovese Murder & Research by Latane and Darley

4. Defining the Bystander Effect: Kitty Genovese Murder & Research by Latane and Darley

In 1964, Kitty Genovese was murdered outside her New York apartment building. Some of her neighbors heard her screams but didn't call for help. This lesson explains the social phenomenon known as the bystander effect, which helps to explain why Genovese's neighbors didn't help her.

Social Exchange Theory vs. Empathy-Altruism

5. Social Exchange Theory vs. Empathy-Altruism

Social psychologists disagree on why people help others. Two theories on the subject are social exchange theory and the empathy-altruism hypothesis. In this lesson, we'll learn more about each of these theories.

Urban Overload, Pluralistic Ignorance & Diffusion of Responsibility: Definition and Effect on Helping

6. Urban Overload, Pluralistic Ignorance & Diffusion of Responsibility: Definition and Effect on Helping

Studies have shown that people in large cities are less likely to help people out than people in small towns. In this lesson, we'll learn why this is by looking at the theories of urban overload, pluralistic ignorance, and diffusion of responsibility.

Social Psychology and its Applications in Environmental Efforts

7. Social Psychology and its Applications in Environmental Efforts

Social psychologists have used information from their experiments to change people's behaviors in an effort to save the environment. In this lesson, we'll look at several psychological principles and how they can be applied to environmental efforts.

The Misinformation Effect and Eyewitness Accounts

8. The Misinformation Effect and Eyewitness Accounts

Many crimes are prosecuted on the basis of eyewitness testimony. But how accurate are eyewitness accounts? The misinformation effect and source monitoring are two psychological principles that explain how sometimes witnesses can be mistaken.

Recovered Memories, False Confessions & the Misinformation Effect

9. Recovered Memories, False Confessions & the Misinformation Effect

The misinformation effect occurs when people are given misleading information that changes their memory of events. It can cause issues with two phenomena in the legal system: recovered memories and false confessions. In this lesson, we'll look at both in more detail.

Deterrence Theory of Punishment: Definition & Effect on Law Obedience

10. Deterrence Theory of Punishment: Definition & Effect on Law Obedience

Deterrence theory says that people obey the law because they are scared of getting caught and being punished. In this lesson, we'll look more closely at deterrence theory and how it relates to drunk driving and the death penalty.

Perceived Behavioral Control: Definition and Relation to Stress

11. Perceived Behavioral Control: Definition and Relation to Stress

How much control over a situation we believe we have, also called our perceived control, helps reduce stress and has many other health benefits. In this lesson, we'll look at studies that demonstrate the powerful effect perceived control can have on our health.

How Seligman's Learned Helplessness Theory Applies to Human Depression and Stress

12. How Seligman's Learned Helplessness Theory Applies to Human Depression and Stress

Learned helplessness is when people feel helpless to avoid negative situations because previous experience has shown them that they do not have control. In this lesson, we'll explore some of the causes and effects of learned helplessness.

Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control: Definition and Meaning

13. Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control: Definition and Meaning

Self-efficacy is the belief that you can succeed in a specific area of your life, and locus of control is how much control you feel like you have over a situation. What do these two things have in common? In this lesson, we'll explore them both and how they relate to each other.

Research on Happiness: What Makes People Happy?

14. Research on Happiness: What Makes People Happy?

Research has found that there are several things that make people happy. Scientists have also discovered that most people don't do a good job of predicting what will make them happy. In this lesson, we'll look at what causes happiness, the relationship of money to happiness, and how accurate people are at making predictions about happiness.

Social Support and Stress: Emotional vs. Instrumental Support

15. Social Support and Stress: Emotional vs. Instrumental Support

Social support is an important tool for coping with stress. There are two main and contradicting hypotheses about the role of social support in stressful situations: the buffering hypothesis and the main effects hypothesis. In this lesson, we'll learn more about social support and its effects on stress.

Social Conflict Theory in Sociology: Definition & Contributors

16. Social Conflict Theory in Sociology: Definition & Contributors

Social conflict theory sees social life as a competition and focuses on the distribution of resources, power, and inequality. Let's take a look at a few of the key aspects of this perspective and test our knowledge with a quiz.

Matthew Effect: Definition & Examples

17. Matthew Effect: Definition & Examples

The name of a rich-poor dichotomy phenomenon is called the Matthew Effect and the following lesson will discuss its origin and various applications. Then following this, you can test your newfound knowledge with a quiz!

Adaptive Coping Strategies: Definition & Examples

18. Adaptive Coping Strategies: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will discuss adaptive coping strategies. Learn about adaptive coping strategies from examples. Then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Maladaptive Coping Strategies: Definition & Examples

19. Maladaptive Coping Strategies: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll learn about maladaptive coping strategies and look at the different ways people cope with stress. We'll also look at what happens when we use maladaptive rather than adaptive coping strategies.

Auguste Comte: Theories & Contributions to Sociology

20. Auguste Comte: Theories & Contributions to Sociology

How did a college dropout with a history of mental illness become one of the most influential thinkers of the 19th century? Read this lesson to find out about Auguste Comte and his ideas about sociology and positivism.

Five Techniques of Neutralization

21. Five Techniques of Neutralization

In this lesson, we will discuss the five techniques of neutralization. Learn more about the five techniques from examples, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Instrumental Support: Definition & Examples

22. Instrumental Support: Definition & Examples

Did you know that every time you take a friend somewhere, you are providing instrumental support? Learn more about instrumental support from examples, and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Interpretivism in Sociology: Definition & Origin

23. Interpretivism in Sociology: Definition & Origin

For this lesson, we'll look at interpretivism and how it relates to the science of sociology. We'll cover the definitions of quantitative research, qualitative research, and interpretivism, and we'll see how the Chicago School influenced this methodology.

John Darley: Biography & Theories

24. John Darley: Biography & Theories

Get to know the life and work of John Darley, noted American social psychologist. Learn about Darley's shocking research and what it tells us about human nature, particularly about how and when people are willing to help others.

John Macionis: Sociology Author, Overview

25. John Macionis: Sociology Author, Overview

Learn about the author John Macionis, and his approach to teaching sociology to college students. Discover why his best-selling textbooks are so successful, then take a brief quiz to test your new knowledge.

Latent Functions in Sociology

26. Latent Functions in Sociology

This lesson discusses the difference between latent and manifest functions and dysfunctions. After starting with a simple example from your own living room, we'll consider how sociologists use the concept to better understand the larger structures of society.

Malthusian Theory of Population Growth: Definition & Overview

27. Malthusian Theory of Population Growth: Definition & Overview

Known for his work on population growth, Thomas Robert Malthus argued that if left unchecked, a population will outgrow its resources, leading to a host of problems. In this lesson, we will define and discuss the Malthusian theory of population growth.

Means of Production in Sociology: Definition & Concept

28. Means of Production in Sociology: Definition & Concept

This lesson describes the concept of means of production, taking a step back in time to the early development of industrialized society and seeing how the means of production continue in modern society. We explore how Karl Marx describes this topic and how critics respond.

Organized Crime: Definition & History

29. Organized Crime: Definition & History

This lesson discusses how organized crime developed in the United States, and the definition for what constitutes a crime organization. You will learn what fuels the development of many groups, and how even an everyday job shares a few basic organizational elements in common with their structure.

Pluralistic Ignorance: Definition & Examples

30. Pluralistic Ignorance: Definition & Examples

Pluralistic ignorance refers to the social phenomenon in which individuals guess wrongly about a group's beliefs and values. Learn more about pluralistic ignorance through examples and then test your knowledge with a quiz in this lesson.

Social Phenomena: Definition & Examples

31. Social Phenomena: Definition & Examples

Social phenomena are an incredibly important aspect of everyone's lives. In this lesson, you'll explore a number of examples of social phenomena that should provide insight into how they influence the evolution of societies.

Social Status: Definition, Types & Examples

32. Social Status: Definition, Types & Examples

In this lesson, we'll be looking at social status. Learn more about the different types of social statuses, including achieved, ascribed, and master status, and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Antisocial Behavior: Definition & Examples

33. Antisocial Behavior: Definition & Examples

This lesson goes over antisocial behavior, or behavior that is reckless and threatening, usually associated with the mental illness known as antisocial personality disorder. We'll cover some examples of the behaviors consistent with this diagnosis.

What is Social Action Theory?

34. What is Social Action Theory?

In this lesson, we will examine a few different sociological theoretical perspectives on social action theory and describe how they interrelate with each other. A brief quiz follows the lesson.

Bruno Latour's Reassembling the Social Summary

35. Bruno Latour's Reassembling the Social Summary

In this lesson, we'll go over the major components of the French Philosopher, Bruno Latour's book 'Reassembling the Social'. We'll talk about how he understands the interaction between human and non-human actors.

Buffering Hypothesis: Definition & Examples

36. Buffering Hypothesis: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn the meaning of the buffering hypothesis, examine reasons that it holds true, and consider examples to further your understanding of this concept. A brief quiz to test your new knowledge follows the lesson.

What Does Taboo Mean? - Definition & Examples

37. What Does Taboo Mean? - Definition & Examples

Although they are less common today than they once were, taboos have long been used to maintain social order. Through this lesson, you will learn how to define the term and explore some examples of past and present taboos.

Compassion vs Empathy

38. Compassion vs Empathy

Have you tried to put yourself in someone else's shoes? If so, you were practicing empathy. In this lesson, we will learn about empathy and how it differs from compassion.

Empathy in Counseling: Definition & Examples

39. Empathy in Counseling: Definition & Examples

Empathy is a powerful skill that connects people through the ability to relate to another's personal perspective and emotions. In this lesson learn how empathy can be applied while providing counseling in a health care setting.

Empathy in Customer Service

40. Empathy in Customer Service

This lesson defines empathy and describes the use of empathy in customer service. It then discusses why empathy is an important component of customer service.

Empathy & Leadership

41. Empathy & Leadership

Empathy, or the ability to understand what other people are feeling, has a powerful impact on your ability to lead. In this lesson, we will explore the ways that your empathy can impact your leadership skills.

Lack of Empathy: Disorders, Signs & Causes

42. Lack of Empathy: Disorders, Signs & Causes

Empathy is our connection to other people. In this lesson, we'll discuss the psychological disorders related to a lack of empathy, including how they appear and what causes them.

Empathy in the Workplace

43. Empathy in the Workplace

Empathy is an important characteristic of relating to others. This lesson discusses empathy in the workplace and the importance of using empathy at work.

Empathy vs Apathy

44. Empathy vs Apathy

Did you know that empathy is considered a healthy behavior, while apathy can be a sign of something wrong? In this lesson, we will learn about empathy, apathy, and how the two are different.

Empathy vs Sympathy

45. Empathy vs Sympathy

In this lesson, we'll talk about the difference between two words that are often confused in our everyday language: sympathy and empathy. We'll talk about how the psychologist Carl Rogers distinguished empathy from sympathy in psychotherapy.

Examples of Empathy Statements in Customer Service

46. Examples of Empathy Statements in Customer Service

This lesson will review a critical component of customer service. We'll discuss examples of how to demonstrate to customers active and empathetic listening to improve engagement and overall communication.

Empathy Maps for Customers

47. Empathy Maps for Customers

Empathy maps are a new tool that companies can use to try to get inside the heads of their customers. This lesson will explain what an empathy map is, the sections of the empathy map, how to have an empathy session, and why companies use empathy maps.

Types of Empathy

48. Types of Empathy

This lesson looks at studies conducted on the types of empathy. The three types of empathy - cognitive, emotional and compassionate - are discussed as to their positive and negative traits (if they have any) and a thorough definition of empathy is given based on these three types of empathy.

Compensatory Strategies: Definition & Examples

49. Compensatory Strategies: Definition & Examples

Did you know that compensatory strategies can be used to help cover up deficits in memory? In this lesson, we will learn about compensatory strategies by using examples.

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 95 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support