Ch 4: Assessments of Learning: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Assessments of Learning chapter of this Educational Psychology Help and Review course is the simplest way to master assessments of learning. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of learning assessments.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering educational psychology material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn educational psychology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding forms of assessment or working with standardized assessments
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning psychology (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about assessments of learning
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra psychology learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Assessments of Learning chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Assessments of Learning chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any assessments of learning question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an assessments of learning unit of a standard college-level educational psychology course. Topics covered include:

  • Qualities of good assessments
  • Validity in assessments
  • Assessments result summaries
  • Use of standard deviation and bell curves for assessment
  • Standardized tests in education
  • High-stakes testing issues
  • Ecological assessments and special education

32 Lessons in Chapter 4: Assessments of Learning: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Forms of Assessment: Informal, Formal, Paper-Pencil & Performance Assessments

1. Forms of Assessment: Informal, Formal, Paper-Pencil & Performance Assessments

Educators often need to assess students' learning and achievement. There are multiple forms of assessments that educators use to not only gain knowledge about a student's level of understanding but also to guide the direction of future lessons and course curriculum. This lesson will differentiate between formal and informal assessments and paper-pencil versus performance-based assessments used in educational settings.

Standardized Assessments & Formative vs. Summative Evaluations

2. Standardized Assessments & Formative vs. Summative Evaluations

If you have ever attended a public school or college you have been subjected to a form of standardized assessment. These assessments serve multiple purposes and provide valuable information regarding one's abilities, understanding and potential. This lesson will introduce you to the types of standardized assessments commonly used in schools and discuss two other types of assessments: formative and summative.

Qualities of Good Assessments: Standardization, Practicality, Reliability & Validity

3. Qualities of Good Assessments: Standardization, Practicality, Reliability & Validity

Have you ever been in the middle of an assessment and thought, 'This question is unfair!' or 'This exam covers material I have never seen before!' If so, the assessment probably did not possess the qualities that make an assessment effective. This lesson will introduce you to the qualities of good assessments: reliability, standardization, validity, and practicality.

Validity in Assessments: Content, Construct & Predictive Validity

4. Validity in Assessments: Content, Construct & Predictive Validity

Ensuring that an assessment measures what it is intended to measure is a critical component in education. Assessment results are used to predict future achievement and current knowledge. This lesson will define the term validity and differentiate between content, construct, and predictive validity.

The Reliability Coefficient and the Reliability of Assessments

5. The Reliability Coefficient and the Reliability of Assessments

How are test scores affected by day-to-day changes of a student? Do different people rate students' performances the same? These questions are addressed through the understanding of reliability. This lesson will define reliability, explain how reliability is measured, and explore methods to enhance reliability of assessments in the classroom.

Performance Assessments: Product vs. Process

6. Performance Assessments: Product vs. Process

Playing a musical instrument, creating a spreadsheet and performing in a play are all activities that many of us engage in on a regular basis. These activities are also examples of ways teachers assess a student's mastery of a subject in educational settings. This lesson will define performance-based assessments and discuss the various uses of performance assessments in the classroom.

Summarizing Assessment Results: Understanding Basic Statistics of Score Distribution

7. Summarizing Assessment Results: Understanding Basic Statistics of Score Distribution

Summarizing test results is a critical component of the assessment process. In order for results to be used effectively, they must be summarized in a way that allows educators to compare the achievement of one student to others. This lesson will describe the first step in summarizing results: understanding the basic statistics of score distribution.

Summarizing Assessment Results: Comparing Test Scores to a Larger Population

8. Summarizing Assessment Results: Comparing Test Scores to a Larger Population

Assessment results can yield valuable information about the individual test-taker and the larger population of test-takers. This lesson will describe how to compare test scores to a larger population by explaining standard score, stanines, z-score, percentile rank and cumulative percentage.

Using Standard Deviation and Bell Curves for Assessment

9. Using Standard Deviation and Bell Curves for Assessment

When a teacher gives an exam in class, how does she decide if the test scores were good or bad? This lesson focuses on classroom assessment, specifically how to analyze the variability of scores within a given group of students. We'll discuss both standard deviation and bell curves.

Norm- vs. Criterion-Referenced Scoring: Advantages & Disadvantages

10. Norm- vs. Criterion-Referenced Scoring: Advantages & Disadvantages

Assessment results allow educators to make important decisions about students' knowledge, abilities and future educational potential. There are multiple ways to summarize and interpret assessment results. This lesson will discuss ways to summarize norm-referenced assessments and criterion-referenced assessments.

Using Mean, Median, and Mode for Assessment

11. Using Mean, Median, and Mode for Assessment

How does a teacher decide what is a good exam score and what is a bad one? This lesson focuses on classroom assessment, but instead of different types of assessment (such as essay versus true/false questions), we'll discuss statistical methods for summarizing scores on any form of testing. Specifically, this lesson covers the statistical tools known as the mean, median and mode.

Standardized Tests in Education: Advantages and Disadvantages

12. Standardized Tests in Education: Advantages and Disadvantages

Standardized tests are used frequently in educational settings. This lesson will help you understand the advantages and disadvantages of these tests and also explore factors that impact standardized test performance.

High-Stakes Testing: Accountability and Problems

13. High-Stakes Testing: Accountability and Problems

Do high test scores equal high achievement? Many politicians and educational reformers think the answer is yes. High-stakes standardized testing has become commonplace in American schools. This lesson will define high-stakes testing and accountability and present problems associated with these types of tests.

Testing Bias, Cultural Bias & Language Differences in Assessments

14. Testing Bias, Cultural Bias & Language Differences in Assessments

Assessments are used to gain useful information about test-takers' knowledge, skills and progress. Sometimes, however, the results of these assessments are incorrect due to biases. This lesson will differentiate and discuss types of testing bias and differences among test-takers that may lead to testing bias.

Use and Misuse of Assessments in the Classroom

15. Use and Misuse of Assessments in the Classroom

Assessments are excellent tools in the classroom. Used properly, they provide invaluable information about student knowledge and progress. However, if misused, assessments can misrepresent the actual knowledge and learning taking place in the classroom. This lesson will discuss the use and misuse of standardized assessments.

Special Education and Ecological Assessments

16. Special Education and Ecological Assessments

An ecological assessment is one type of assessment that is used to help students that have special needs. In this lesson, we discuss ecological assessments, what they entail, and how they are used.

Accommodations for Special Education Students

17. Accommodations for Special Education Students

Explore what accommodations for special education students are, how they are determined, and how they are implemented. Learn how accommodations differ from modification.

Construct Validity in Psychology: Definition & Examples

18. Construct Validity in Psychology: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will learn all about the construct validity. Explore the difference between convergent and discriminant validity, the threats to construct validity, and more.

Special Education Procedural Safeguards: IDEA & Explanation

19. Special Education Procedural Safeguards: IDEA & Explanation

IDEA regulations include a set of procedural safeguards designed to protect the rights of children with disabilities, their parents, and the involved agencies. This lesson explores the most important safeguards afforded to families under IDEA.

Summative Assessments: Examples & Types

20. Summative Assessments: Examples & Types

Think of state exams, midterms, finals, graded papers, and standardized tests such as the SAT. They all have one thing in common - they are summative assessments! Find out more in this lesson.

Alternatives to Standardized Testing

21. Alternatives to Standardized Testing

This lesson will highlight alternatives to standardized testing that teachers can use as to assess student achievement in the classroom. A short quiz will follow that will test your knowledge of lesson concepts.

Cultural Bias in Standardized Testing

22. Cultural Bias in Standardized Testing

This lesson will highlight cultural biases in standardized testing and its impact on minority student learning. A short quiz will follow to test your knowledge.

Dynamic Assessment: Definition, Process & Examples

23. Dynamic Assessment: Definition, Process & Examples

This lesson provides a review of Vygotsky's zone of proximal development and how dynamic assessment is used to find a student's zone of proximal development through a process of pretest, teach, and retest.

Examples of Standardized Tests

24. Examples of Standardized Tests

In this lesson, you'll learn about some of the most common examples of standardized tests. Through examples, you'll explore some of the basic functions of standardized testing and how they are commonly used.

History of Standardized Testing in Texas

25. History of Standardized Testing in Texas

In this lesson, we'll examine the brief but tumultuous history of standardized testing in Texas. We'll cover how the tests have evolved, why Texas is so important in standardized testing, and how the state's policies have impacted the entire country.

How to Improve Standardized Test Scores

26. How to Improve Standardized Test Scores

In this lesson we will look at ways a teacher can help to improve standardized test scores. Main concepts include knowing curriculum, practicing material, teaching test-taking strategies, and using technology to help students prepare.

Pros & Cons of Standardized Testing

27. Pros & Cons of Standardized Testing

As a teacher, you will encounter standardized testing many times in your career. This lesson will highlight some of the pros and cons of standardized testing.

Reasons and Purposes for Standardized Testing

28. Reasons and Purposes for Standardized Testing

Ever wanted to know the big deal behind standardized testing? Take a close look at why standardized testing is important for students, teachers, and parents.

Standardized Test Vocabulary

29. Standardized Test Vocabulary

This lesson will highlight vocabulary terms that are commonly associated with standardized assessment tests. A short quiz will follow that will allow you to test your knowledge.

What is Standardized Testing? - Definition & Types

30. What is Standardized Testing? - Definition & Types

This lesson highlights the concept of standardized testing. We will also discuss the various types of standardized tests as well as learn some limitations that come with this kind of testing.

Learning Style Assessments: Definition & Tools

31. Learning Style Assessments: Definition & Tools

Understanding and assessing a student's learning style can help teachers adapt their teaching strategies to help their students learn. This lesson describes three learning style assessments and tools for applying their principles.

Writing Student Learning Objectives: Verbs & Examples

32. Writing Student Learning Objectives: Verbs & Examples

Writing an effective learning objective ensures that students learn the desired content and are able to perform a new skill or achieve a measurable learning outcome. In this lesson, we will discuss strategies for writing effective learning objectives.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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