Copyright

Ch 4: ASSET Writing Skills Test: Sentence Structure

About This Chapter

Reinforce your current knowledge of the components and structure of sentences. The video lessons and self-assessment quizzes provide overviews of these concepts to prepare you for the ASSET Writing Skills test.

ASSET Writing Skills: Sentence Structure - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter are designed to review what you know or introduce you to new facts about sentence structure. You will go over the definitions and examples of sentence components. Once you are familiar with this material, you can express the following and answer specific questions found on the ASSET Writing Skills test:

  • Understanding what a clause is
  • Recognizing and combining independent and dependent clauses
  • Finding subjects and verbs in a sentence
  • Defining modifier and recognizing misplaced and dangling modifiers
  • Using adjectives and adverbs
  • Identifying sentence fragments, comma splices and run-on sentences
  • Writing logical sentences
  • Avoiding mixed structure sentences

Instructors guide you through the concepts to effectively prepare you for the ASSET Writing Skills exam. You can assess what you've learned using the quizzes accompanying each lesson and use the timeline to access only those parts of the video where you might need further review.

ASSET Writing Skills: Sentence Structure - Chapter Objectives

The ASSET Writing Skills exam is used to measure your proficiency in English punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, style and organization. The Sentence Structure chapter provides you with the opportunity to go over what makes an effective and meaningful sentence. Items involving sentence structure account 36% of the entire 36-item test. The test is paper-based and consists of three passages with accompanying multiple-choice questions.

ASSET exams are student placement and advisement exams used by many community and technical colleges. The ASSET Writing Skills exam is one of three Basic Skills tests, which also include reading and numerical skills. There is no passing or failing score attached to these exams.

10 Lessons in Chapter 4: ASSET Writing Skills Test: Sentence Structure
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Clause?

1. What is a Clause?

In this lesson, we will define what a clause is. We will then look at the different types of clauses, define each of the types, provide some examples of each, and then discuss why they are important in our writing.

Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

2. Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

This lesson is about independent and dependent clauses, and how they make up a sentence. Dependent clauses, like the name suggests, rely on other elements in a sentence. Independent clauses, on the other hand, can stand alone. Learn more in this lesson.

How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

3. How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

Don't pass over this lesson! You may think you know how to find subjects and verbs in a sentence, but picking them out can be harder than you think. Identifying subjects and verbs is the first step to unlocking nearly everything else about English composition.

Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

4. Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

Clauses are a great mystery to many people when dealing with our written language. Watch this video lesson to discover clauses and also to learn how to combine clauses correctly.

What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

5. What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

I have this recurring nightmare where all my modifiers are misplaced or dangling and everybody's laughing at me. Don't let this happen to you! Learn why modifiers are important and why putting them in the right place is even more so.

ACT English Practice: Adjectives, Adverbs and Modifiers

6. ACT English Practice: Adjectives, Adverbs and Modifiers

Do you know your adjectives and adverbs pretty good? Hopefully not, because you ought to know them pretty well! In this lesson, we'll review the rules, and then, you'll get a little practice to let it all sink in.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

7. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

8. Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

Sentence fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences are grammatical and stylistic bugs that can seriously derail an otherwise polished academic paper. Learn how to identify and eliminate these errors in your own writing here.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

9. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

10. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support