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Ch 4: Basic Anatomy & Cell Biology Study Guide

About This Chapter

The Basic Anatomy and Cell Biology chapter of this Human Physiology Study Guide course is the simplest way to master basic anatomy and cell biology. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you learn the essentials of basic anatomy and cell biology.

Who's It For:

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering basic anatomy and cell biology material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn basic anatomy and cell biology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding basic anatomy and cell biology
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning science (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about basic anatomy and cell biology
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra science learning resources

How It Works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Basic Anatomy and Cell Biology chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Basic Anatomy and Cell Biology chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about basic anatomy and cell biology. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a basic anatomy and cell biology unit of a standard human physiology course. Topics covered include:

  • Nucleus structure
  • Structure and function of ribosome, endomembrane systems and cytoskeleton,
  • Mitochondria structure
  • Hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of the phospholipid bilayer
  • Fluid mosaic model
  • Passive and active transport in cells
  • Endocytosis and exocytosis in cell membranes
  • Multicellular organisms, tissues and epithelium
  • Layers and function of skin
  • Epithelial tissue
  • Anatomical directional terminology
  • Planes of the human body

21 Lessons in Chapter 4: Basic Anatomy & Cell Biology Study Guide
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

1. Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

In this lesson, we'll discuss the organization and importance of the nucleus in your cells. This is the membrane-bound structure responsible for containing all the genetic material essential to making you who you are.

The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

2. The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

The ribosome is the cellular structure responsible for decoding your DNA. In this lesson, we'll learn about ribosome structure, function and location - characteristics that make it a very good genetic translator.

The Endomembrane System: Functions & Components

3. The Endomembrane System: Functions & Components

In this lesson, we'll learn about the endomembrane system, which consists of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. This system is important in making, packaging, and shipping all sorts of goodies for the cell to use!

The Cytoskeleton: Microtubules and Microfilaments

4. The Cytoskeleton: Microtubules and Microfilaments

In this lesson, we'll learn about the cytoskeleton of your cells. This network of microtubules, intermediate filaments, and microfilaments helps different types of cells maintain a unique set of characteristics, including shape and movement.

Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

5. Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

If you want to make it through the day, you're going to need some energy. In this lesson, we'll learn about the organelle that supplies this energy, the mitochondrion, and why this cell structure appreciates the time you took to eat breakfast this morning!

How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

6. How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

In this lesson, we will learn what gives phospholipids a dual personality. How can this molecule be both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and why is this important to a cell?

The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

7. The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we will discuss the components of the cell membrane and why the fluid mosaic model paints the best picture of its structure. We'll learn about the roles of the phospholipid bilayer, cholesterol, proteins and carbohydrates.

Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

8. Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

A cell membrane is selectively permeable - not permeable to everything. In this lesson, we'll talk about methods of passive transport along a concentration gradient, including simple and facilitated diffusion and osmosis.

Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

9. Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll learn how substances are transported across the cell membrane against the concentration gradient. This might seem like an uphill battle for the cell, but all it takes is a little chemical energy and a few integral membrane proteins to kick off some active transport!

Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

10. Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we'll discover how some cells can eat, drink, and digest their dinner through the process of endocytosis and a structure called the lysosome. In addition, we'll learn how a cell can throw out the leftovers across the cell membrane during exocytosis.

Multicellular Organisms, Tissues and Epithelium

11. Multicellular Organisms, Tissues and Epithelium

In this lesson on multicellular organisms, you'll take a look at what it actually means to be multicellular and how cells are organized into tissues, organs, and organ systems. This lesson also covers one of the four main tissue types: epithelial tissue.

Human Skin: Layers, Function & Structure

12. Human Skin: Layers, Function & Structure

This lesson will cover the three main layers of your skin, which includes the epidermis, dermis, and subcutis. In addition, we'll learn about other skin cells and tissue, such as adipose tissue, keratinocytes, melanocytes, and Merkel's cells.

What Is Epithelial Tissue? - Function, Types & Structure

13. What Is Epithelial Tissue? - Function, Types & Structure

This lesson will cover the different shapes and structures of epithelial tissue, including simple, columnar, cuboidal, stratified, transitional, squamous, and pseudostratified columnar epithelium.

Anatomical Directional Terminology: Anterior, Posterior and More

14. Anatomical Directional Terminology: Anterior, Posterior and More

Find out how to properly refer to the location of things at the front and back of a person as well as above or below a certain point on the body by learning the terms anterior, posterior, superior, and inferior.

Anatomical Directional Terminology: Limbs, Hands & Feet

15. Anatomical Directional Terminology: Limbs, Hands & Feet

In this lesson, you'll learn how we term the different sides of our feet and hands thanks to words like dorsal, plantar and palmar. You'll also learn how we name something that is near or far away from the trunk of our body thanks to words like proximal and distal.

Anatomical Directional Terminology: Lateral, Medial & More

16. Anatomical Directional Terminology: Lateral, Medial & More

Learn what it means to be on the same side as something else or on a different side altogether. In addition, find out what it means to be closer to or farther away from the middle of something as we explore the following terms: lateral, medial, ipsilateral, and contralateral.

Planes of the Human Body: Definition, Anatomy & Diagram

17. Planes of the Human Body: Definition, Anatomy & Diagram

Learn about the different ways in which your body can be divided or cut up for theoretical and practical purposes as we explore the sagittal plane, transverse plane and coronal plane.

Serous Membrane: Definition & Function

18. Serous Membrane: Definition & Function

Your body has an unsung hero called the serous membrane. This lesson defines a serous membrane and explains precisely why it helps keep you alive on a daily basis!

Adrenergic Receptors: Alpha & Beta

19. Adrenergic Receptors: Alpha & Beta

Once you're done with this lesson on alpha and beta adrenergic receptors, you'll be able to explain why people carry around epinephrine auto-injectors in case of emergency.

Buccal Cavity: Definition, Structure & Function

20. Buccal Cavity: Definition, Structure & Function

This lesson goes over something called the buccal cavity. You'll learn what that actually means, where it's found in your body, as well as its structure and function.

What is Comparative Anatomy? - Definition & Examples

21. What is Comparative Anatomy? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll first review evolution, then we'll look at one of the main types of evidence for evolution, comparative anatomy. We'll look at homologous, analogous, and vestigial structures, and go over examples of each.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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