Ch 1: Basic Tenets of Teaching Reading

About This Chapter

Begin your approach to literacy education by learning about five basic tenets, as well as other fundamental methods and processes used to teach reading. This chapter is a helpful resource for completing a course, preparing for an exam or if you are simply interested in the subject.

Basic Tenets of Teaching Reading - Chapter Summary

How did you learn how to read? If you think about it, you know the process was far more involved than simply waking up one day knowing how to comprehend strings of letters. This chapter introduces you to five basic tenets, or principles, that are followed when teaching others how to read. These tenets have roots in educational psychology and are explained in detail through a series of topic-focused lessons. You can learn how to identify and define these principles, while studying practical strategies and teaching examples that can be applied to a real classroom setting. No matter what your schedule looks like, these lessons and corresponding quizzes may be accessed whenever you can make time to study; all you need is a mobile device or a computer with an internet connection. When you've completed the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Define and differentiate the five basic tenets of teaching reading
  • Describe the ways a teacher can help a child make connections between reading and writing
  • Explain constructivism and how it helps students become active learners
  • Understand how prior knowledge and context clues assist students in constructing meaning
  • Explain how knowledge may be constructed through experience and social interaction
  • Elaborate on the methods and benefits of collaborative learning
  • Define metacognition and detail how this process can develop the student reader's abilities

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: Basic Tenets of Teaching Reading
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Five Basic Tenets for Teaching Reading

1. The Five Basic Tenets for Teaching Reading

Teachers put a lot of time into designing lessons to teach the many skills involved in reading. This lesson outlines the five tenets followed when teaching reading.

Connections Between Reading & Writing for Children

2. Connections Between Reading & Writing for Children

Reading and writing are intimately connected to each other. While this may seem intuitive to many adults, this isn't always clear to children. In this lesson, we'll look at what teachers can do in the classroom to help students with both.

Constructivism: Definition, Types & Contributors

3. Constructivism: Definition, Types & Contributors

Are you just a sponge absorbing information? Or are you actively constructing your own reality even as you read this? This lesson looks at the constructivist point of view for how we come to acquire knowledge.

Constructivism: Overview & Practical Teaching Examples

4. Constructivism: Overview & Practical Teaching Examples

Learning through real-world experiences with others allows students to grow and understand things more easily. In this lesson, we'll examine constructivism in depth, including social learning, the zone of proximal development, and project-based learning.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

5. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

Social Constructivism and the Mediated Learning Experience

6. Social Constructivism and the Mediated Learning Experience

A well-accepted fact among educational psychologists is the idea that knowledge is not absorbed but rather constructed through a person's experiences with his or her environment. This knowledge may be constructed individually or collaboratively. This lesson will briefly explain the processes behind knowledge construction and provide information on how socially constructed knowledge can advance the cognitive development of learners.

What Is Collaborative Learning? - Benefits, Theory & Definition

7. What Is Collaborative Learning? - Benefits, Theory & Definition

Find out about collaborative learning, how it helps the individual student, and the theories behind it. After completing the lesson, take a short quiz to test your knowledge.

What is Metacognition in Psychology? - Definition & Examples

8. What is Metacognition in Psychology? - Definition & Examples

Have you ever stopped to think about your thoughts? Sounds kind of deep, right? But actually, being metacognitive can help people with memory and awareness. Want to know how? Read on.

Metacognitive Strategies: Definition & Examples

9. Metacognitive Strategies: Definition & Examples

This lesson will define and explain in detail what metacognitive strategies are and how they can be used in the classroom to help deepen students' thinking about content and develop students who are ready and willing to tackle new content.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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