Ch 9: Bonding: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Bonding chapter of this High School Chemistry Help and Review course is the simplest way to master chemistry. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of chemical bonding.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering high school chemistry material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn chemistry. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in their understanding of atoms, ions and chemical bonds
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning science (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about chemical bonds
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra science learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Bonding chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know; review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Bonding chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any chemical bonding question. They're here to help!
  • Study with Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a chemical bonding unit of a standard high school chemistry course. Topics covered include:

  • Covalent, hydrogen, ionic and polar covalent bonds
  • Lewis structures of atoms
  • Molecular orbital theory
  • Organic molecules
  • The Octet Rule

24 Lessons in Chapter 9: Bonding: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

1. Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

Mom always said that sharing is caring. This lesson will explore how electrons affect the chemical reactivity of atoms and specifically the merits of sharing electrons.

Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

2. Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

Did you know that the scientific name for table salt is sodium chloride? Find out how sodium and chlorine atoms come together to form your favorite seasoning.

Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

3. Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

Are you confused about how you can tell what kind of bond two atoms will form? This lesson will help you understand the difference between polar and nonpolar covalent bonds as well as how to predict how two atoms will interact.

Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

4. Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

This lesson defines and discusses important concepts behind hydrogen bonding. You'll learn when and why these bonds occur and which atoms are often involved.

The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

5. The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

Learn the octet rule and how it applies to electron energy levels. Identify valence electrons and learn how to determine them by looking at the periodic table. Also, discover how they pertain to the octet rule. Learn how to draw the Lewis diagram of an atom, and understand how it provides clues to chemical bonding.

Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

6. Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

Learn how ions are formed using the octet rule. Use the periodic table to predict the charge an atom will have when it becomes an ion. Learn whether an ion is a cation or anion and how to write the formula depending on what charge the ion has.

Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

7. Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

In this lesson, you'll learn about ionic compounds and how they form. Additionally, you'll learn the properties of ionic compounds, such as their high melting and boiling points, their ability to conduct electricity, and the fact that they form crystals.

Naming Ionic Compounds: Simple Binary, Transition Metal & Polyatomic Ion Compounds

8. Naming Ionic Compounds: Simple Binary, Transition Metal & Polyatomic Ion Compounds

An important part of dealing with chemical compounds is knowing how to refer to them. Learn how to name all ionic compounds, including simple binary compounds, compounds containing transition metals and compounds containing polyatomic ions.

Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

9. Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

Learn about covalent bonds, how covalent compounds are formed and the properties inherent to covalent compounds, such as low melting and boiling points, in this lesson. Also, learn what rules to follow to name simple covalent compounds.

Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

10. Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

Review what a Lewis dot diagram is and discover how to draw a Lewis dot structural formula for compounds. Learn how to represent single, double and triple bonds with lines instead of dots. Also, learn how compounds arrange themselves.

Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

11. Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

This lesson defines Lewis dot structures and explains how to draw them for molecules in step-by-step detail. We'll also explore polyatomic ions and how to draw Lewis dot structures for them.

Lewis Dot Structures: Resonance

12. Lewis Dot Structures: Resonance

In this lesson, we'll review Lewis dot structures and how to draw them. Then, learn about resonance and resonance structures for molecules and polyatomic ions. Afterwards, assess your new knowledge with a quiz.

Covalent Bonds: Predicting Bond Polarity and Ionic Character

13. Covalent Bonds: Predicting Bond Polarity and Ionic Character

Learn about covalent bonds and their two types: nonpolar covalent bonds and polar covalent bonds. Discover how to predict the type of bond that will form based on the periodic table. Learn what ionic character means and how to determine it.

VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

14. VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

In this lesson, you'll learn about the VSEPR theory and how it can be used to explain molecule shapes. Then, learn how to predict the shape of a molecule by applying the VSEPR theory to the Lewis dot structure.

Dipoles & Dipole Moments: Molecule Polarity

15. Dipoles & Dipole Moments: Molecule Polarity

Learn about dipoles and dipole moments in this lesson. Understand the relationship between dipole moments and molecule polarity, and learn how to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar.

Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole & Ion-Dipole Forces: Strong Intermolecular Forces

16. Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole & Ion-Dipole Forces: Strong Intermolecular Forces

Learn about intermolecular vs. intramolecular forces. Learn the different intermolecular bonds (including hydrogen bonding and dipole-dipole and ion-dipole forces), their strengths, and their effects on properties, such as boiling and melting points, solubility, and evaporation.

London Dispersion Forces (Van Der Waals Forces): Weak Intermolecular Forces

17. London Dispersion Forces (Van Der Waals Forces): Weak Intermolecular Forces

Learn how London dispersion forces are created and what effect they have on properties such as boiling and melting points. Discover this weak intermolecular force and how it is one of the Van der Waals forces.

Using Orbital Hybridization and Valence Bond Theory to Predict Molecular Shape

18. Using Orbital Hybridization and Valence Bond Theory to Predict Molecular Shape

You'll learn how to explain how shapes of molecules can be predicted using valence bond theory and hybridization. When finished, you'll understand the difference between sigma and pi bonds and how the VSEPR theory, along with the hybridization theory, helps predict the shape of a molecule.

Molecular Orbital Theory: Tutorial and Diagrams

19. Molecular Orbital Theory: Tutorial and Diagrams

Learn how to sketch the overlap of orbitals to form sigma and pi bonds. Use the molecular orbital theory to determine bond order. Discover how bond order affects bond strength and bond energy.

Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

20. Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

Learn why metallic bonding is called the electron sea model. Discover why metals bond the way they do and why they are shiny, malleable and conduct electricity well.

Intramolecular Bonding and Identification of Organic and Inorganic Macromolecules

21. Intramolecular Bonding and Identification of Organic and Inorganic Macromolecules

Understand what a macromolecule is and be able to identify both organic and inorganic macromolecules. Organic molecules include proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids.

Organic Molecules: Alkanes, Alkenes, Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Isomers

22. Organic Molecules: Alkanes, Alkenes, Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Isomers

Learn more about carbon and hydrogen and see how these atoms come together to form distinct molecules. Also, study the difference between saturated and unsaturated molecules.

Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

23. Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

Learn what an organic compound is and how their functional groups affect them. Identify the different types of functional groups including alcohols, alkyl halides, ketones, aldehydes, ethers, carboxylic acids and esters.

Structural Formula: Definition & Examples

24. Structural Formula: Definition & Examples

Chemical compounds are made of atoms bonded together. The way the atoms are bonded together in a compound is shown by its structural formula. In this lesson, we will learn about the different types of structural formulas and look at an example for each formula.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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