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Ch 8: Building Reading Comprehension & Literacy

About This Chapter

This chapter approaches reading comprehension and literacy from a teacher's perspective, using a series of simple-to-follow lessons taught by professional instructors to help you promote student growth in this area.

Building Reading Comprehension and Literacy - Chapter Summary

This chapter digs into various approaches and considerations of facilitating the development of reading comprehension and literacy in students, providing a thoughtful yet time-efficient review of the following topics:

  • How culture, ethics, and linguistics relate to reading development
  • Literal, inferential, and evaluate forms of reading comprehension
  • Teaching reading comprehension and questioning techniques
  • The Schema-Theoretic approach
  • Methods of literacy advocation
  • The importance of independent reading and enjoying language
  • Interactive reading and self-monitoring
  • Motivating students to read
  • Involving parents and the community in student literacy

If you're worried about staying organized with all of this material, you can use the dashboard feature as a virtual home for your learning. There, you can keep tabs on your progress through the lessons as well as your recent studying activity while also checking out links to practice quizzes and additional courses relevant to you.

13 Lessons in Chapter 8: Building Reading Comprehension & Literacy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Cultural, Ethnic & Linguistic Relationships to Reading Development

1. Cultural, Ethnic & Linguistic Relationships to Reading Development

All students have different backgrounds to bring to the classroom. This video lesson addresses some things to consider in a reading classroom with regards to students of different cultures.

Reading Comprehension: Literal, Inferential & Evaluative

2. Reading Comprehension: Literal, Inferential & Evaluative

Reading comprehension involves three levels of understanding: literal meaning, inferential meaning, and evaluative meaning. This lesson will differentiate and define these three levels.

How to Teach Reading Comprehension

3. How to Teach Reading Comprehension

Teaching reading comprehension requires instilling in the learner the use of several strategies and skills. This lesson will focus on cognitive skills and notation strategies that will enhance reading comprehension.

Using the Schema-Theoretic Approach to Reading Instruction

4. Using the Schema-Theoretic Approach to Reading Instruction

As a reader, are you just absorbing what a text says? In this lesson, we'll discuss the role of schemas in the reading process and how we interpret more than just words on a page.

Teaching Questioning Techniques for Reading Comprehension

5. Teaching Questioning Techniques for Reading Comprehension

Students who know how to ask good questions can quickly grow their own comprehension abilities. In this lesson, you'll learn some techniques for teaching students how to ask questions that boost their own comprehension.

Literacy Strategies for Teachers

6. Literacy Strategies for Teachers

The best way for children to grow as readers is for them to constantly practice and engage in reading. Reading research tells us that thinking about what your brain is doing when reading, or being metacognitive, helps one to progress in regard to comprehension. Children need to know what and why they're reading. Implementing specific literacy strategies will help them accomplish this.

Enjoyment of Language for Literacy Development

7. Enjoyment of Language for Literacy Development

It is easy to focus on aspects of literacy development like decoding, fluency and comprehension but then forget about the importance of joy. This lesson will discuss the importance of enjoyment of language in literacy development.

How Students Read Interactively to Construct Meaning

8. How Students Read Interactively to Construct Meaning

How do readers interact with a text, and how does that interaction help them comprehend what they are reading? In this lesson, we'll examine interactive reading and its elements.

How Students Can Self-Monitor for Reading Comprehension

9. How Students Can Self-Monitor for Reading Comprehension

Reading comprehension is a crucial skill for students to learn. One way that educators can help student improve is by encouraging self-monitoring. Explore this idea and learn some techniques to teach self-monitoring for reading comprehension.

The Importance of Independent Reading for Developing Comprehension

10. The Importance of Independent Reading for Developing Comprehension

Teachers use many strategies and methods to teach students to understand what they read. This lesson defines independent reading, explains why it is an important part of comprehension acquisition, and shows how it fits into a literacy program.

Strategies for Motivating Students to Read

11. Strategies for Motivating Students to Read

One of the biggest hurdles of reading instruction is helping students become motivated to read. This lesson will detail several strategies you can use in your classroom to help students become motivated, lifelong readers.

Promoting Parent Involvement in Student Literacy

12. Promoting Parent Involvement in Student Literacy

Parent involvement is important to help students become lifelong readers and writers. Still, there are challenges to promoting effective parent involvement. This lesson offers ideas for engaging parents in young children's literacy development.

Community Resources for Reading Development

13. Community Resources for Reading Development

In this lesson, we will discuss how to identify and recruit a variety of community resources to promote reading development. These strategies serve to both engage the student in reading for pleasure and engage the community in improving literacy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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