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Ch 19: CAHSEE - Statistics, Probability & Working with Data: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Statistics, Probability & Working with Data chapter of this CAHSEE Math Help and Review course is the simplest way to master statistics and probability. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of statistics and probability.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering CAHSEE math material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to prepare for the CAHSEE math exam. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding how to calculate probabilities; interpret charts, graphs and tables; or use data to make estimates and predictions
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning math (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about statistics and probability
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra math learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Statistics, Probability & Working with Data chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Statistics, Probability & Working with Data chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any statistics and probability question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a statistics and probability unit of a standard high school math course. Topics covered include:

  • Simple conditional probabilities
  • Probabilities of simple, compound and complementary events
  • Probabilities of independent and dependent events
  • Probabilities of overlapping and non-overlapping events
  • Mean, median, mode and range
  • Bar graphs, line graphs and pie charts
  • Relative and cumulative frequency tables
  • Scatterplots and correlation coefficients
  • Categorical and quantitative data

20 Lessons in Chapter 19: CAHSEE - Statistics, Probability & Working with Data: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

1. How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

Conditional probability refers to the probability that an event will occur provided a previous event occurs. Learn about simple conditional probabilities and how to calculate them. Explore dependent events, understand how they differ from conditional probabilities, and review conditional probability examples.

Probability of Independent Events: The 'At Least One' Rule

2. Probability of Independent Events: The 'At Least One' Rule

Independent events do not affect the outcome of events that follow, but it is generally important that they occur at least once. Learn how to use the 'At Least One' rule when calculating the probability of independent events.

Probability of Simple, Compound and Complementary Events

3. Probability of Simple, Compound and Complementary Events

Probability can be calculated for simple, compound, and complementary events. Explore each type of event, understand how each event differs from the other types, and learn how to calculate each type of event's probability by reviewing examples.

Probability of Independent and Dependent Events

4. Probability of Independent and Dependent Events

Probability is a ratio that predicts the likelihood an event will occur. Explore the concept of probability and understand the difference between independent and dependent events. Learn how to calculate the probability of both independent and dependent events, and review examples.

Understanding Bar Graphs and Pie Charts

5. Understanding Bar Graphs and Pie Charts

Bar graphs and pie charts are some of the most used graphical ways to present data. Learn how to read bar graphs and pie charts, and explore some examples to understand how they are interpreted.

Mean, Median, Mode & Range

6. Mean, Median, Mode & Range

The four most common measures of central tendency are the mean, median, mode, and range. Understand and calculate the mean, median, mode, and range through the given sample problems.

How to Calculate Percent Increase with Relative & Cumulative Frequency Tables

7. How to Calculate Percent Increase with Relative & Cumulative Frequency Tables

Statistics often are expressed as percentages. Learn how to calculate percent increase using relative and cumulative frequency tables by exploring relative and cumulative frequencies, reviewing how to organize frequency data in a frequency table, and applying formulas to calculate percent increases.

Either/Or Probability: Overlapping and Non-Overlapping Events

8. Either/Or Probability: Overlapping and Non-Overlapping Events

Either/or probability of overlapping and non-overlapping events is determined by either adding the probability of each event occurring together or by subtracting out the probability of the overlapping event. Explore probability and overlapping vs. non-overlapping events.

Statistical Analysis with Categorical Data

9. Statistical Analysis with Categorical Data

Statistical analysis with categorical data is the mathematical process of converting categorical data into percentages and displaying it using data tables. Learn more about statistical analysis with categorical data, bar graphs, data tables, and how to represent data as percentages.

Summarizing Categorical Data using Tables

10. Summarizing Categorical Data using Tables

Categorical data are named this way because they can be categorized or grouped, and they can be demonstrated using tables. Through an example, learn how to prep your data, make a data table, and use percentages to analyze the data.

Make Estimates and Predictions from Categorical Data

11. Make Estimates and Predictions from Categorical Data

Categorical data is information that can be gathered and then grouped into specific categories and also represented on bar graphs. Learn more about the definition of categorical data, bar graphs, and how this information is useful to individuals in making estimates and predictions.

What is Quantitative Data? - Definition & Examples

12. What is Quantitative Data? - Definition & Examples

Quantitative data allow researchers to answer questions that require counting and measurement. Learn about data that can be counted, data that can be measured, and uses of quantitative data.

Reading and Interpreting Line Graphs

13. Reading and Interpreting Line Graphs

Line graphs, with lines connecting points of data to each other, can provide insights into various kinds of data. Through various examples, learn how to read and interpret different line graphs.

Making Estimates and Predictions using Quantitative Data

14. Making Estimates and Predictions using Quantitative Data

In research, quantitative data has specific values represented by numbers. Learn about quantitative data and explore ways to use it to make estimates and predictions. Review scatter plots and understand how to determine relationships between quantitative data sets.

Creating & Interpreting Scatterplots: Process & Examples

15. Creating & Interpreting Scatterplots: Process & Examples

Creating and interpreting scatterplots is a great depiction of a correlation between two sets of data. Learn more about scatterplots, including the process of creating them and some examples.

The Relationship Between Variables: Correlation Coefficient & Scatterplots

16. The Relationship Between Variables: Correlation Coefficient & Scatterplots

A scatterplot visually represents a correlation: the relationship between two variables. Understand and define scatterplots and the correlation coefficients, explore scatterplots, and examine the coefficients and plots.

Using Tables and Graphs in the Real World

17. Using Tables and Graphs in the Real World

Tables represent data with rows and columns while graphs provide visual diagrams of data, and both are used in the real world. Explore tables, graphs, and examples of how they are used for common things, such as explaining a cell phone plan and charting population growth.

Arithmetic Mean: Definition, Formula & Examples

18. Arithmetic Mean: Definition, Formula & Examples

Arithmetic mean is the average of a set of numerical values, which is determined by adding all of the numbers in a set and dividing by the total number of values. Learn about the definition, formula, and real-world examples of arithmetic mean.

Bimodal Distribution: Definition & Example

19. Bimodal Distribution: Definition & Example

Graphs can reveal trends and 'points of interests' like maximum and minimum values. In this lesson we are going to examine a particular phenomenon called Bimodal Distribution and demonstrate what that looks like on a graph.

What is a Pilot Study? - Definition & Example

20. What is a Pilot Study? - Definition & Example

When researchers conduct a study before the intended study, this is known as a pilot study. Understand the definition and review examples of a pilot study, examine the reasons to employ a pilot study, and explore the limitations of this type of study.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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