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Ch 3: CBEST Reading: Vocabulary & Language

About This Chapter

Let us show you how to improve your vocabulary and language skills. The video lessons and self-assessment quizzes in this chapter provide several approaches to help you pass the reading portion of the California Basic Educational Skills Test.

CBEST Reading: Vocabulary & Language Chapter Summary

The reading section of the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) tests your vocabulary and language skills, among other abilities. By completing this series of video lessons on this topic, you'll learn to recognize the main idea of reading selections as well as the audience they're addressing. You'll also be introduced to various literary terminology, such as simile, metaphor, allusion, illusion, synecdoche and metonymy. Vocabulary and language topics covered in this chapter include the following:

  • Using context and structural analysis to determine the meaning of words
  • Constructing meaning
  • Connotation and denotation
  • Identifying different interpretations of a reading selection
  • Identifying different interpretations of words
  • How context can affect the meaning of words, sentences and paragraphs
  • The function of transitions in reading selections
  • Using syntax to determine the meaning of words
  • Types of irony
  • Cliches, paradoxes and equivocations

Objectives of the CBEST Reading: Vocabulary & Language Chapter

Prospective public school teachers in California and Oregon need to pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test to earn their credentials. The reading portion of this 3-part test, which also assesses your math and writing skills, includes 50 multiple-choice questions. Approximately 60% of these questions focus on your comprehension and research abilities.

These vocabulary and language lessons include both a video presentation and a self-assessment test. You can use the latter to test your skills before or after watching the video, or you can take it both before and after to see how much the video improved your comprehension.

10 Lessons in Chapter 3: CBEST Reading: Vocabulary & Language
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

1. How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

With diligence and intrepid ingenuity, you can use context to ascertain the purport of a word. In other words, in this lesson, we'll find out how to use context to figure out what words mean.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

2. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

3. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

4. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

5. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

6. Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

Would you lend your ears for a moment (or at least your eyeballs)? This lesson will explain what synecdoche and metonymy mean and how to spot them in a piece of prose or poetry.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

7. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

8. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

9. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

10. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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