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Ch 6: Cell Biology for High School Biology Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Cell Biology chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach the students in your classroom about topics and processes that include ribosomes, viruses, exocytosis and endocytosis. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Cell Biology chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday How a Phospholipid Bilayer is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic;
The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane;
Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion and Osmosis
The differences between hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules;
The characteristics of a cell membrane;
An explanation of concentration gradients and passive transport
Tuesday Active Transport in Cells: Definition and Examples;
Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane;
Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane and Nuclear Pores
The differences between an antiport and a symport;
A look at these processes;
A description of the nuclear envelope and nuclear pores
Wednesday The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location;
The Endomembrane System: Functions and Components;
The Cytoskeleton: Microtubules and Microfilaments
The process of protein synthesis;
The inner workings of the endomembrane system;
The cytoskeleton, its components, and their roles
Thursday Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner and Outer Membrane;
Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid and Grana
The process by which mitochondria supply the body with energy;
The components of the chloroplast and their various roles
Friday Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole;
Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences;
Viruses: Bacteriophage Lytic and Lysogenic Cycles
A look at plant cells and how they differ from human cells;
Examples of eukaryotes and prokaryotes;
The characteristics of a virus, and an exploration of the living things they infect

13 Lessons in Chapter 6: Cell Biology for High School Biology Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

1. How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

In this lesson, we will learn what gives phospholipids a dual personality. How can this molecule be both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and why is this important to a cell?

The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

2. The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we will discuss the components of the cell membrane and why the fluid mosaic model paints the best picture of its structure. We'll learn about the roles of the phospholipid bilayer, cholesterol, proteins and carbohydrates.

Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

3. Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

A cell membrane is selectively permeable - not permeable to everything. In this lesson, we'll talk about methods of passive transport along a concentration gradient, including simple and facilitated diffusion and osmosis.

Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

4. Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll learn how substances are transported across the cell membrane against the concentration gradient. This might seem like an uphill battle for the cell, but all it takes is a little chemical energy and a few integral membrane proteins to kick off some active transport!

Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

5. Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we'll discover how some cells can eat, drink, and digest their dinner through the process of endocytosis and a structure called the lysosome. In addition, we'll learn how a cell can throw out the leftovers across the cell membrane during exocytosis.

Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

6. Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

In this lesson, we'll discuss the organization and importance of the nucleus in your cells. This is the membrane-bound structure responsible for containing all the genetic material essential to making you who you are.

The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

7. The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

The ribosome is the cellular structure responsible for decoding your DNA. In this lesson, we'll learn about ribosome structure, function and location - characteristics that make it a very good genetic translator.

The Endomembrane System: Functions & Components

8. The Endomembrane System: Functions & Components

In this lesson, we'll learn about the endomembrane system, which consists of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. This system is important in making, packaging, and shipping all sorts of goodies for the cell to use!

The Cytoskeleton: Microtubules and Microfilaments

9. The Cytoskeleton: Microtubules and Microfilaments

In this lesson, we'll learn about the cytoskeleton of your cells. This network of microtubules, intermediate filaments, and microfilaments helps different types of cells maintain a unique set of characteristics, including shape and movement.

Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

10. Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

If you want to make it through the day, you're going to need some energy. In this lesson, we'll learn about the organelle that supplies this energy, the mitochondrion, and why this cell structure appreciates the time you took to eat breakfast this morning!

Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

11. Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

In this lesson, we'll explore the parts of the chloroplast, such as the thylakoids and stroma, that make a chloroplast the perfect place for conducting photosynthesis in plant cells.

Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

12. Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

In this lesson, we'll talk about some of the things that make plant cells so different from our cells. In addition to being mean, green photosynthesizing machines, plant cells have cell walls and central vacuoles to make them unique!

Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

13. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

In this lesson, we discuss the similarities and differences between the eukaryotic cells of your body and prokaryotic cells such as bacteria. Eukaryotes organize different functions within specialized membrane-bound compartments called organelles. These structures do not exist in prokaryotes.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the High School Biology Curriculum Resource & Lesson Plans course

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