Ch 2: Cell Organelles

About This Chapter

Review these fun and engaging biology lessons to study the basic concepts related to cell organelles. This chapter includes instruction on cell organelle types, structures and functions.

Cell Organelles - Chapter Summary

Refresh and sharpen your knowledge of cell organelles with this comprehensive biology study resource. The short and engaging lessons in this chapter examine the structures and functions of several cell organelles in a way that's easy to follow and remember. You'll compare and contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells and learn where ribosomes are located in a cell. After completing the lessons in this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Describe the structure of the nucleus
  • Understand the function and structure of nuclear envelopes
  • Compare the functions and structures of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum
  • Know what ribosomes do and where they're located
  • Define the Golgi apparatus
  • Outline the structure of mitochondria
  • Recognize the structures and functions of chloroplast, plant cells, cilia and flagella
  • Assess the similarities and differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells

These biology lessons are great study resources because they package cell organelle information into bite-sized chunks, which helps you quickly review and retain the information. Our lessons are typically less than ten minutes long and taught by expert biology instructors. Following each lesson is a short self-assessment quiz that measures your comprehension of the material. To help you study whenever and wherever it's convenient, we've made this chapter available 24/7 and accessible on any computer or mobile device.

12 Lessons in Chapter 2: Cell Organelles
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

1. Structure of the Nucleus: Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, and Nuclear Pores

In this lesson, we'll discuss the organization and importance of the nucleus in your cells. This is the membrane-bound structure responsible for containing all the genetic material essential to making you who you are.

Nuclear Envelope: Definition, Function & Structure

2. Nuclear Envelope: Definition, Function & Structure

The nuclei of eukaryotic cells are separated from the cytosol by the nuclear envelope. In this lesson, we explore the structure of the nuclear envelope and the functions it performs in cells.

Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum: Definition, Structure & Functions

3. Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum: Definition, Structure & Functions

Cells contain many parts. Each of these parts have specific functions to ensure the survival of living things. In this lesson, you will learn about the part of the cell known as the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum: Definition, Functions & Structure

4. Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum: Definition, Functions & Structure

Without them you couldn't survive, but you probably know nothing about them. We're referring to an organelle called smooth endoplasmic reticulum. This lesson will explain why this organelle is important as well as look at its structure and function.

The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

5. The Ribosome: Structure, Function and Location

The ribosome is the cellular structure responsible for decoding your DNA. In this lesson, we'll learn about ribosome structure, function and location - characteristics that make it a very good genetic translator.

Golgi Apparatus: Definition & Function

6. Golgi Apparatus: Definition & Function

Eukaryotic cells contain many organelles to carry out their life functions. One of these important organelles is known as the Golgi apparatus. In this lesson, we'll learn about the structure and function of this organelle.

Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

7. Mitochondria Structure: Cristae, Matrix and Inner & Outer Membrane

If you want to make it through the day, you're going to need some energy. In this lesson, we'll learn about the organelle that supplies this energy, the mitochondrion, and why this cell structure appreciates the time you took to eat breakfast this morning!

Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

8. Chloroplast Structure: Chlorophyll, Stroma, Thylakoid, and Grana

In this lesson, we'll explore the parts of the chloroplast, such as the thylakoids and stroma, that make a chloroplast the perfect place for conducting photosynthesis in plant cells.

Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

9. Plant Cell Structures: The Cell Wall and Central Vacuole

In this lesson, we'll talk about some of the things that make plant cells so different from our cells. In addition to being mean, green photosynthesizing machines, plant cells have cell walls and central vacuoles to make them unique!

Cilia in Cells: Definition, Functions & Structure

10. Cilia in Cells: Definition, Functions & Structure

Cilia have a cool name, but what are they? What do they do? Complete this lesson to find out what your cilia are up to and why you should be impressed with their hard work!

Flagella: Definition, Structure & Functions

11. Flagella: Definition, Structure & Functions

One of the more dramatic ways that single-celled organisms get around is a whip-like structure called a flagellum. Learn the ways that different organisms make use of their flagella to move around their microscopic world.

Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

12. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells: Similarities and Differences

In this lesson, we discuss the similarities and differences between the eukaryotic cells of your body and prokaryotic cells such as bacteria. Eukaryotes organize different functions within specialized membrane-bound compartments called organelles. These structures do not exist in prokaryotes.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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