Ch 27: CEOE Business Education: The U.S. Legal System

About This Chapter

Refresh your knowledge of the U.S. legal system through short and entertaining videos. These lessons provide all the info you need to answer related questions on the CEOE Business Education exam.

CEOE Business Education: U.S. Legal System - Chapter Summary

Enhance your preparation for the CEOE Business Education exam by viewing these fun and fast video lessons covering the U.S. legal system. You'll quickly get up to speed on concepts such as:

  • Differences between public and private law
  • Criminal and civil law differences
  • Definition of substantive and procedural laws
  • Court system levels and structure
  • U.S. Supreme Court function and jurisdiction
  • Court functions
  • Subject matter jurisdiction and jurisdiction over property
  • Determination of venue for a court case

Professional instructors lead these lessons, renewing your interest in legal system topics you studied in college as well as offering new perspectives on the subject. Lessons are mobile friendly, so you can prepare for the exam at work or on the go at any time that's convenient for you.

Objectives of the CEOE Business Education: U.S. Legal System Chapter

The CEOE Business Education exam is a requirement to earn a license and become a business teacher in Oklahoma. Assessing your knowledge of fundamental business topics, it asks questions on business management, accounting, finance and economics, info systems and marketing. Your understanding of the U.S. legal system is tested in the business management subarea, which comprises about 25% of the exam. While there is one constructed-response question on the exam, the remaining 80 questions are in a multiple-choice format. Prepare for the style of questions you'll primarily see on the exam with our self-assessment quizzes that follow each lesson.

13 Lessons in Chapter 27: CEOE Business Education: The U.S. Legal System
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Public Law vs. Private Law: Definitions and Differences

1. Public Law vs. Private Law: Definitions and Differences

The simple difference between public and private law is in those that each affects. Public law affects society as a whole, while private law affects individuals, families, businesses and small groups.

Criminal Law vs. Civil Law: Definitions and Differences

2. Criminal Law vs. Civil Law: Definitions and Differences

There are two main classifications of law. Criminal laws regulate crimes, or wrongs committed against the government. Civil laws regulate disputes between private parties. This lesson explains the main differences between criminal and civil law.

Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

3. Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

Substantive law and procedural law work together to ensure that in a criminal or civil case, the appropriate laws are applied and the proper procedures are followed to bring a case to trial. In this lesson, we'll discuss the differences between the two and how they relate to the legal system as a whole.

The Court System: Trial, Appellate & Supreme Court

4. The Court System: Trial, Appellate & Supreme Court

There are three separate levels of courts in our legal system, each serving a different function. Trial courts settle disputes as the first court of instance, appellate courts review cases moved up from trial courts and supreme courts hear cases of national importance or those appealed in the court of appeals.

The 3 Levels of the Federal Court System: Structure and Organization

5. The 3 Levels of the Federal Court System: Structure and Organization

The federal court system has three main levels: U.S. District Court, U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. Each level of court serves a different legal function for both civil and criminal cases.

Overview of the US Supreme Court

6. Overview of the US Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court justices reside over cases involving original jurisdiction under certain circumstances and appellate jurisdiction when a decision from a lower court involving constitutional law is at issue. Appellate cases require a writ of certiorari requesting permission to address this court.

State Court System: Structure & Overview

7. State Court System: Structure & Overview

There is no uniform structure to the State Court System. Each state has its own system but most states operate similarly to the Federal Court System in that there are several levels of courts including trial courts, intermediate appellate courts and supreme courts.

Long Arm Statute: Definition & Example

8. Long Arm Statute: Definition & Example

Long-arm statute refers to the jurisdiction a court has over out-of-state defendant corporations. International Shoe v. State of Washington was a landmark case that set precedent for establishing the right for government to use the long-arm statute to bring an action against a defendant corporation.

Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

9. Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

Courts exercise two types of jurisdiction over cases: original jurisdiction and appellate jurisdiction for cases previously heard in a lower court. Judges have the option, when hearing an appeals case, to reverse or remand a decision based on a violation of law like abuse of discretion.

Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

10. Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

One of the ways a court determines whether a case will be heard is based on subject matter jurisdiction. We will explore several factors that determine subject matter jurisdiction in state and federal courts, including concurrent subject matter jurisdiction.

Jurisdiction over Property: Definition & Types

11. Jurisdiction over Property: Definition & Types

In rem and quasi in rem jurisdiction give a court power over property. The court's power over the property can be used as leverage or as a means of satisfying a civil action against a defendant. The conditions that are required determine the court's ability to exercise both types of jurisdiction of property.

What is the Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court?

12. What is the Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court?

The U.S. Supreme Court exercises a right to preside over specific cases and is considered the court of original jurisdiction based on subject-matter jurisdiction. It is considered an appellate court for cases involving constitutional law under certain circumstances.

How Venue is Determined for a Court Case

13. How Venue is Determined for a Court Case

Venue is the location where a civil or criminal case is decided. The venue is decided similarly in civil and criminal trials. However, the venue is decided differently in state and federal courts.

Chapter Practice Exam
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