Ch 8: CEOE Early Childhood Ed: Motivating Students

About This Chapter

Brush up on the theories associated with motivational strategies in the classroom as you get geared up to take the CEOE Early Childhood Education Test. See how well you know the material by taking our quizzes and chapter exam.

CEOE Early Childhood Ed: Motivating Students - Chapter Summary

Motivating young learners requires a broad knowledge of theoretical and practical approaches, and these video lessons will help you re-familiarize yourself with such related concepts as Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the social-cognitive theory, and the self-determination theory. To be in good shape to do well on the CEOE Early Childhood Education Test, this chapter will also help you go over the following:

  • Reasons to include motivation in schools
  • Key motivational theories (attribution, expectancy value, and goal orientation)
  • The benefits of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation in the classroom
  • Self-regulated learning in relation to the attributions and expectations of the teacher
  • A comparison of self-concept and self-efficacy

Our instructors understand that you need the right tools for your test preparation needs, which is why they have assembled this chapter to address learners of all types. The animated video lessons allow you to go over the topics visually, and the transcripts have highlighted keywords for better rote memorization. We also give you access to our instructors, so you can send in your questions and get the answers you need to help you feel confident for the CEOE Early Childhood Education Test.

CEOE Early Childhood Ed: Motivating Students Chapter Objectives

Oklahoma educators seeking certification to teach at the early childhood level must pass the CEOE Early Childhood Education Test with a score of 240 points or higher. Of the 81 questions on the test, 80 questions require test-takers to select one of the available responses. The last question requires a written response that may ask you to assess a situation or provide feedback on how to approach a classroom problem.

The test has been broken into three sub-areas, and questions about motivation are found within the third area, education programs for early childhood development. Of the four objectives listed under this sub-area, one objective measures whether teachers comprehend the connection between childhood development and such concepts as motivation, self-concept, autonomy, and self-discipline, especially as these topics relate to learning experiences. This sub-area makes up 22% of the exam, so let our chapter give you the info you need to do well.

13 Lessons in Chapter 8: CEOE Early Childhood Ed: Motivating Students
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Importance of Motivation in an Educational Environment

1. The Importance of Motivation in an Educational Environment

In this lesson, you'll see how motivation affects learning. Discover the behaviors and perspectives that relate to motivation in an educational environment.

Social-Cognitive Learning Theory: Definition and Examples

2. Social-Cognitive Learning Theory: Definition and Examples

Have you learned behaviors or skills from observing others? Maybe you have learned from observing a teacher, friend, or supervisor. We acquire new knowledge and skills from a variety of methods. This lesson will introduce the concepts of the social-cognitive theory, which focuses on the learning that occurs within a social context.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: Definition, Theory & Pyramid

3. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: Definition, Theory & Pyramid

Why is it that when some of our needs aren't met, it's almost impossible to concentrate on other ones? Psychologist Abraham Maslow spent his career looking for these answers. Watch this lesson to learn about some of his most important conclusions.

Albert Bandura: Social-Cognitive Theory and Vicarious Learning

4. Albert Bandura: Social-Cognitive Theory and Vicarious Learning

A person's cognition, environment and behavior play important roles in learning new knowledge and skills. This lesson will focus on Albert Bandura's contributions to social learning and vicarious experiences.

Attribution Theory and the Principle of Locus of Control

5. Attribution Theory and the Principle of Locus of Control

What do you attribute your successes or failures to? Do you feel like luck and chance are involved, or do you feel like you're in control of your achievements and behavior? This lesson will provide you with an overview of attribution theory and the principles of locus of control.

Expectancy Value Theory: Age, Gender & Ethnicity Differences

6. Expectancy Value Theory: Age, Gender & Ethnicity Differences

The values placed on an object or event and our expectancies of performance play a large role in determining the level of effort and ultimately the level of achievement for a given activity. This lesson will detail two popular models of expectancy-value theory and provide suggestions on how to incorporate these theories into a classroom setting.

Goal Orientation Theory: How Goals Affect Student Motivation & Behavior

7. Goal Orientation Theory: How Goals Affect Student Motivation & Behavior

What academic goals do you set for yourself? Are you driven by interest in the academic discipline or by extrinsic factors, such as receiving a higher salary because you have a degree? You may be driven by both. This lesson will explore goals and how they affect student motivation and behavior.

Using Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation to Enhance Learning

8. Using Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation to Enhance Learning

Why do you want to learn about educational psychology? Do you enjoy reading about different theories and practices? Do you have to pass this class in order to receive a degree? Our behaviors are driven by intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. In this lesson, distinguish between these types of motivation and learn how they can enhance learning.

Self-Efficacy vs. Self-Concept: Differences & Effects on Outcome Expectations

9. Self-Efficacy vs. Self-Concept: Differences & Effects on Outcome Expectations

How do you perceive yourself? Are you good in a particular academic discipline? Do you like being around others, or do you prefer to spend time alone? The answers to these questions help make up your self-concept and self-efficacy. This lesson will differentiate between these two concepts and explore outcomes of high and low self-efficacy.

Self-Determination Theory: Capacity, Strategy & Control Beliefs

10. Self-Determination Theory: Capacity, Strategy & Control Beliefs

How do you stay motivated? What motivates your peers and coworkers? Are rewards motivating factors or do people have an internal drive to persist until a given activity is completed? This lesson will describe a theory that encompasses both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators: the self-determination theory.

The Role of Motivation in Self-Regulated Learning

11. The Role of Motivation in Self-Regulated Learning

Do you monitor and evaluate your own learning? Do you alter the way you study based on performance on assessments? If so, you are engaging in self-regulation practices and, by doing so, increasing the likelihood of academic achievement. This lesson will define self-regulation, discuss the cyclical process of self-regulation and explore methods to promote self-regulation in the classroom.

Teacher Expectations & Attributions

12. Teacher Expectations & Attributions

Attributions for success and failure drive future expectations for learning and success. Students attribute their successes or failures to a number of factors. Teachers also make attributions for student performance. This lesson will explore teacher expectations and attributions that affect classroom and individual student performance.

Learned Helplessness in Children: Definition

13. Learned Helplessness in Children: Definition

Why do people just give up? Why are some situations deemed hopeless? This lesson will introduce you to the concept of learned helplessness in order to answer the above questions and provide recommendations on dealing with learned helplessness in the classroom.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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