Ch 18: CEOE Physics: Atomic Structure & Nuclear Physics

About This Chapter

Review the topics you need to know to pass the CEOE Physics test. This chapter covers the fundamentals of atomic structure and nuclear physics, with lessons on topics like fusion, particle physics, nuclear equations, and more!

CEOE Physics: Atomic Structure and Nuclear Physics - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter can help you prepare for the CEOE Physics examination. Review theories and applications of atomic structure and nuclear physics. Re-examine what you know about elements, early atomic theory, and sub-atomic particles. Go over topics such as nuclear notation, nuclear radiation and the hydrogen atom. This chapter offers assistance with:

  • Studying the history of atomic theory
  • Explaining the Bohr model and the Rutherford model
  • Describing elements, mass number and atomic number
  • Learning about different kinds of radioactive decay
  • Studying the process of balancing nuclear equations
  • Measuring half-life and interpreting decay graphs
  • Understanding carbon dating, fission and fusion
  • Exploring mass-energy conversion and nuclear binding energy as well as particle physics

These and other topics are explained in this chapter's fun and informative text and video lessons. As you watch the video lessons, use the handy video tags to re-watch specific parts of the video. You can submit any questions to the lesson instructors. The self-assessment quizzes and chapter examination test your knowledge along with your preparedness to answer some of the questions on the CEOE Physics examination.

CEOE Physics: Atomic Structure and Nuclear Physics - Chapter Objectives

In addition to the information in this chapter, the CEOE Physics exam covers topics such as electricity and magnetism, waves, acoustics and optics, and thermal and modern physics. The exam is part of the certification process to teach physics in the Oklahoma Public School system. The computer-based exam consists of 80 selected-response questions and one constructed-response assignment. You will have four hours to finish the examination.

10 Lessons in Chapter 18: CEOE Physics: Atomic Structure & Nuclear Physics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

1. Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

Imagine firing a bullet at a piece of tissue paper and having it bounce back at you! You would probably be just as surprised as Rutherford when he discovered the nucleus. In this lesson, we are going to travel back in time and discuss some of the major discoveries in the history of the atom.

The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

2. The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

Do you ever wonder where light comes from or how it is produced? In this lesson, we are going to use our knowledge of the electron configurations and quantum numbers to see what goes on during the creation of light.

What Are Elements?

3. What Are Elements?

Look around you. What do you see? Elements are everywhere. They are the building blocks of all matter on Earth. In this lesson, we will discuss what an element is, how elements are written as symbols, and how elements are the building blocks of all matter.

Atomic Number and Mass Number

4. Atomic Number and Mass Number

Atoms are the basic building blocks of everything around you. In order to really understand how atoms combine to form molecules, it's necessary to be familiar with their structure. In this lesson, we'll dissect atoms so we can see just what really goes into those little building blocks of matter.

Types of Radioactive Decay and Their Effect on the Nucleus

5. Types of Radioactive Decay and Their Effect on the Nucleus

What is meant by the term 'radioactive'? In this lesson we will break down the three main types of nuclear decay particles and discuss their composition, their effect on the nucleus, and their applications.

Balancing Nuclear Equations & Predicting the Product of a Nuclear Reaction

6. Balancing Nuclear Equations & Predicting the Product of a Nuclear Reaction

When a radioactive particle gives off radiation, what happens to the particle? This lesson will explain the three major types of radiation and what effect they have on the decaying atom.

Half-life: Calculating Radioactive Decay and Interpreting Decay Graphs

7. Half-life: Calculating Radioactive Decay and Interpreting Decay Graphs

What causes a radioactive particle to decay? We'll never really know, but our best guess lies in probability. In this lesson, we are going to focus on the half-life, a way of measuring the probability that a particle will react.

Fusion, Fission, Carbon Dating, Tracers & Imaging: Applications of Nuclear Chemistry

8. Fusion, Fission, Carbon Dating, Tracers & Imaging: Applications of Nuclear Chemistry

What can the sun do that we can't? How do carbon atoms 'date'? Are radioactive isotopes helpful in the medical field? The answers to these questions can be found in this lesson on the applications of nuclear chemistry.

Mass-Energy Conversion, Mass Defect and Nuclear Binding Energy

9. Mass-Energy Conversion, Mass Defect and Nuclear Binding Energy

When you hear the term 'nuclear power,' what comes to mind? Do you know where that energy and power is coming from? In this lesson, we are going to zoom in on the nucleus of a helium atom to explain how something as small as a nucleus can produce an extremely large amount of energy.

Standard Model of Particle Physics

10. Standard Model of Particle Physics

After completing this lesson, you will be able to explain what the standard model of physics is, name the particles that are part of the standard model, and some of the things it can't currently explain. A short quiz will follow.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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