Ch 12: Chapter 12: An Age of Reform (1820-1860)

About This Chapter

The An Age of Reform chapter of this Prentice Hall America Textbook Companion course helps students learn the essential history lessons of 19th-century reform movements. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the An Age of Reform textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in Prentice Hall America's An Age of Reform chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the reform movement topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Major reform movements of the 1800s
  • Origin of slavery in the U.S.
  • Growth of slavery in the South
  • Key abolitionist movement leaders
  • Pre-Civil War opposition to slavery
  • Women's rights and 19th-century feminism
  • Women's opportunities for advancement in the 1800s
  • American Renaissance art and literature

Prentice Hall America is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

8 Lessons in Chapter 12: Chapter 12: An Age of Reform (1820-1860)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reform Movements of the 19th Century

1. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

Slavery in America: Cotton, Slave Trade and the Southern Response

2. Slavery in America: Cotton, Slave Trade and the Southern Response

The United Sates was conceived on the idea of freedom and the rights of all people, but early on, an institution took hold that was the exact opposite of that idea. In this lesson, find out the roots of slavery in the States, how it took hold, how slaves lived, and how they resisted the bonds of slavery.

Slavery in Early America: Characteristics & Opposition

3. Slavery in Early America: Characteristics & Opposition

The institution of slavery in early America was a source of both economic profits and divisive tensions. It began as a peculiar institution of colonial society and blossomed into a sectional issue that threatened to destroy the young United States.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

4. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

5. Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

Uncle Tom's Cabin captured the plight of slaves in the 1850s like no other book. The novel, coupled with the Missouri Compromise and the Fugitive Slave Act, served to further strain the country, which was at a breaking point over the issue of slavery. This lesson details these events.

Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

6. Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

In this lesson, we explore the early women's rights movement and their rejection of traditional gender roles in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the United States and Great Britain.

Advancement for Women: Education, Employment & Rights

7. Advancement for Women: Education, Employment & Rights

In this lesson, we will take a look at the advancement of women's rights during the 19th and early 20th centuries. We'll learn about the key events and themes surrounding the 'first wave' of the feminist movement and see how they impacted society.

American Renaissance: Uniquely American Art, Literature and Culture

8. American Renaissance: Uniquely American Art, Literature and Culture

America began creating its own distinct culture in the 1800s. Learn about popular trends in art, literature, and pop culture in the antebellum era. Also, learn how religion and utopian communes changed the way some Americans lived.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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