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Ch 2: Chapter 2: Growth and Conflict (1789 - 1877)

About This Chapter

The Growth and Conflict chapter of this Glencoe U.S. History Textbook Companion course helps students learn the essential history lessons regarding the new republic's growth and conflicts during 1789 to 1877. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Growth and Conflict textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in Glencoe U.S. History's Growth and Conflict chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the American growth and conflict topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Political, economic and social events shaping the young republic
  • Key conflicts and reform movements impacting 19th-century America
  • The impact of Manifest Destiny in the United States
  • The American Civil War's causes, major battles and costs
  • The Reconstruction period's successes and failures

Glencoe U.S. History is a registered trademark of McGraw-Hill Education, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

72 Lessons in Chapter 2: Chapter 2: Growth and Conflict (1789 - 1877)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

1. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

George Washington and the New United States Government

2. George Washington and the New United States Government

George Washington was the United States' first president. He knew everything he did would set the stage for future presidents of the country. A heavy weight was on his shoulders, and much of what he established in his two terms set the precedent for presidents today.

Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

3. Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

Although President Washington warned against the nation falling into political factions, the different views of the Constitution held by Alexander Hamilton and the Federalists and Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans set the path for the two-party system that the U.S. has today.

President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

4. President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

John Adams was an important founder of the United States. In many ways, he was the voice of the Revolution. As president, he had some proud shining moments and one major blight on his legacy.

President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

5. President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

The presidential election of 1800 was a rematch between President John Adams and Vice President Thomas Jefferson. An electoral tie between Jefferson and his running mate forced the House of Representatives to decide. The election inaugurated 24 years of political dominance for the Democratic-Republican Party.

Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

6. Thomas Jefferson's Presidency: Louisiana Purchase, Lewis & Clark, and More

Thomas Jefferson is often noted as one of the best presidents in history. In our lesson, learn about some of President Jefferson's many famous domestic accomplishments and the controversy surrounding most of them.

President Madison and the War of 1812

7. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

James Madison After the War of 1812: The Era of Good Feelings

8. James Madison After the War of 1812: The Era of Good Feelings

What do African pirates, American highways and British forts all have in common? President Madison paid attention to all of them in the 'Era of Good Feelings.'

John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

9. John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

Think old Supreme Court cases don't relate to your life today? Under the leadership of Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court made many landmark decisions that shaped the American judicial system - including the rights of citizens - and affect the most important cases in the country to this day.

James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

10. James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

Can you imagine a time when there was only one political party in the United States? Find out why James Monroe was one of the nation's most popular presidents during his lifetime and learn about his foreign policy that endured for nearly a century.

The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

11. The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

In the half-century before the Civil War, America experienced a transportation revolution that improved the way people and goods crossed the nation, opened up new areas for settlement and altered the centers of economic power.

Economic Developments in the North: A Commercial Revolution

12. Economic Developments in the North: A Commercial Revolution

In the Antebellum Era, the Northern part of the United States was revolutionized by a series of innovations, triggering a shift from an agricultural to a commercial economy. These economic changes sharpened the differences between North and South.

Problems of Urbanization and Daily Life in the North

13. Problems of Urbanization and Daily Life in the North

In the antebellum years, American cities grew. Find out why and what it was like to live in New York, Philadelphia and other Northern cities in the middle of the 19th century.

Life in the South: Ordered Society and Economy of the Southern States

14. Life in the South: Ordered Society and Economy of the Southern States

While the North was urbanizing and industrializing, the South became more committed to its rural, leisurely lifestyle and its agricultural economy built on slave labor. Limited industry did exist, but cotton was king!

American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

15. American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

New agricultural technology revolutionized the North, South and West. In this lesson, learn how that technology ushered in the Market Revolution in America.

Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

16. Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

Find out how and why America's population grew tremendously in the first part of the 1800s. Then, learn how America became a market economy and added new transportation routes.

Slavery in America: Cotton, Slave Trade and the Southern Response

17. Slavery in America: Cotton, Slave Trade and the Southern Response

The United Sates was conceived on the idea of freedom and the rights of all people, but early on, an institution took hold that was the exact opposite of that idea. In this lesson, find out the roots of slavery in the States, how it took hold, how slaves lived, and how they resisted the bonds of slavery.

Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

18. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

19. President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

In this lesson, we will explore the dirty politics of the 1828 election and the Age of the Common Man in American politics. Discover how this election changed American politics forever.

Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

20. Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

In this lesson, we will explore sectional tensions that emerged between the West, North, and South over land and tariffs, leading to confrontations in the Senate and a second nullification crisis.

The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

21. The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

In this lesson, we'll discuss Jackson's forced removal of Native Americans from their land in the east to new territory west of the Mississippi River.

Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

22. Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

In this lesson, we will discuss how Andrew Jackson's administration strengthened executive power as well as the rise of the Whig Party in opposition to Jackson and his policies.

Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

23. Jacksonian America: Bank of the United States and the Panic of 1837

In this lesson, we will discuss President Andrew Jackson's economic policies, including his determination to close the Bank of the United States and the financial panic of 1837.

The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

24. The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

The spirit of the Revolution led to changes in American churches in the post-war years. Beginning with a boom in evangelism and missionary work, the Second Great Awakening soon led to social reform, an intertwining of religious values with civic values, and a lasting emphasis on morality in daily life.

Reform Movements of the 19th Century

25. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

American Renaissance: Uniquely American Art, Literature and Culture

26. American Renaissance: Uniquely American Art, Literature and Culture

America began creating its own distinct culture in the 1800s. Learn about popular trends in art, literature, and pop culture in the antebellum era. Also, learn how religion and utopian communes changed the way some Americans lived.

Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

27. Feminism in the 19th Century: Women's Rights, Roles, and Limits

In this lesson, we explore the early women's rights movement and their rejection of traditional gender roles in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the United States and Great Britain.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

28. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

29. Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

During the early and mid-1800s, education reformers pushed to establish free public schools throughout the U.S. Their efforts also led to the establishment of American universities and the first generation of American writers.

Manifest Destiny's Texas Annexation Problem

30. Manifest Destiny's Texas Annexation Problem

Find out why it took five presidents (Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler and Polk) to get Texas annexed into the U.S. and added as a state during the era of Manifest Destiny.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

31. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

Election of 1848 and the California Gold Rush

32. Election of 1848 and the California Gold Rush

General Zachary Taylor was elected president in 1848, hoping to see the peaceful addition of land from the Mexican cession. 'Old Rough and Ready' wasn't prepared for the California gold rush.

President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

33. President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

Following President Zachary Taylor's death, Millard Fillmore took office. He supported the Compromise of 1850 that added new states from the Mexican cession and attempted to resolve long-standing controversies over slavery.

Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

34. Uncle Tom's Cabin and Tension Over Slavery in the 1850s

Uncle Tom's Cabin captured the plight of slaves in the 1850s like no other book. The novel, coupled with the Missouri Compromise and the Fugitive Slave Act, served to further strain the country, which was at a breaking point over the issue of slavery. This lesson details these events.

Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

35. Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

The events in the Kansas territory were a microcosm of the violent forces shaping the United States in the decade of the 1850s, forces that would ultimately lead to a disintegration of the Union itself. This lesson details what has come to be known as Bleeding Kansas and its impact on the issue of slavery.

Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

36. Dred Scott v. Sanford and President Buchanan

The Dred Scott decision was one of the most important turning points in the debate over slavery in the United States. It came during the presidency of James Buchanan, a man well qualified but ill suited for the job of keeping the nation together. This lesson discusses both as we attempt to understand the dynamics that led to the American Civil War.

John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

37. John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry: Fighting Slavery

John Brown was a man of strong convictions - so strong that he was willing to fight, to kill, and to die for them. These abolitionist beliefs led him from Kansas to Virginia, where he would pay the ultimate price. This lesson tells that story.

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

38. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858: Summary & Significance

In an effort to secure their own appointments to the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas squared off in a series of seven debates in 1858. Find out why Douglas might have won in the short term but Lincoln won in the long term.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

39. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

Frederick Douglass: Narrative and Style

40. Frederick Douglass: Narrative and Style

In this lesson, we will learn about Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who became one of the most powerful voices in the abolitionist movement in the United States. In addition, we will examine his written work, most notably his first autobiography - ''Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.''

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

41. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

South Carolina's attack on a U.S. military outpost triggered the American Civil War. Learn more about the Battle of Fort Sumter and the consequences of the fort's surrender to the Confederacy.

The Creation of the Confederacy: Leadership & Goals

42. The Creation of the Confederacy: Leadership & Goals

In this lesson, we will take a look at the 1861 creation of the Confederate States of America. We will examine the new country's government, meet its leaders, and learn about its goals.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

43. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

President Lincoln's Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

44. President Lincoln's Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, had a cabinet filled with political rivals and large political personalities whom he relied upon to win the Civil War. Learn how Lincoln adeptly handled the differences and difficulties within his cabinet during his presidency in this video lesson.

President Davis' Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

45. President Davis' Cabinet: Members & Dynamics

Confederate President Jefferson Davis was the only leader the short-lived Confederacy ever had. His Cabinet members struggled to provide him with advice and help during the difficult struggle to keep the Confederacy alive during the Civil War.

The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

46. The First Battle of Bull Run: Civil War Blood is Shed

Three months after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Northern troops attacked Southern forces near the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. The first Battle of Bull Run (or Manassas) was the first major engagement of the Civil War and a terrifying defeat for the Union spectators who came to watch.

The Anaconda Plan: Civil War Strategy

47. The Anaconda Plan: Civil War Strategy

The Anaconda Plan was a strategy created by Union General Winfield Scott in 1861, early on in the Civil War. It called for strangling the Southern Confederacy, much like an Anaconda. It was never officially adopted by the Union government.

The Civil War West of the Mississippi River: Summary & Major Events

48. The Civil War West of the Mississippi River: Summary & Major Events

West of the Mississippi River, the Civil War was a struggle for territory and border states that lacked much of the bloodshed in the east, yet was still important to the war's outcome. This lesson will cover some of the key events of this theater of the war.

The Battle of Shiloh: Conflict, Outcome & Generals Involved

49. The Battle of Shiloh: Conflict, Outcome & Generals Involved

The Battle of Shiloh was fought on April 6 and 7, 1862. Confederate forces launched a surprise attack against Union troops, but Union forces ultimately hung on and won. There were well over 23,000 casualties in the two days of fighting.

The Battle of Antietam: Conflict, Outcome & Significance

50. The Battle of Antietam: Conflict, Outcome & Significance

The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862. It was the bloodiest single day battle in American history, with over 23,000 casualties. The Union victory there led to the Emancipation Proclamation.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

51. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

Civilian Reaction in the Confederacy to the War: The Impact on Daily Life & the Economy

52. Civilian Reaction in the Confederacy to the War: The Impact on Daily Life & the Economy

In this lesson, we will study the Confederate home front. We will examine how the Civil War affected the South's government, economy, and social fabric, and we will see how the Southerners faced destruction and displacement throughout the war.

How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

53. How the Civil War Affected the Economy and Everyday Life in the North and South

With the strongest and most productive demographic of society away fighting in the Civil War, the task of running homes, communities, and the nation fell to those who stayed behind. The war on the home front changed their lives forever.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

54. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

55. Gettysburg Address: Summary & Analysis

This lesson discusses the Gettysburg Address, one of the most famous speeches in American history. Learn more about what Abraham Lincoln's speech means and test your knowledge with a quiz.

Sherman's March to the Sea

56. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General William T. Sherman began his Atlanta campaign. His success assured Lincoln's re-election in 1864. Sherman then began his destructive March to the Sea in order to capture Savannah.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

57. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

General Robert E. Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse: Terms & Conditions

58. General Robert E. Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse: Terms & Conditions

In this lesson, we will explore the events leading up to Confederate General Robert E. Lee's surrender to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9th, 1865.

The End of the Civil War: Summary & Timeline

59. The End of the Civil War: Summary & Timeline

Contrary to popular belief, the Civil War did not end when Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. It actually continued for over two months. In this lesson, we will examine the final days of the Civil War.

The Costs of the Civil War: Human, Economic & Cultural

60. The Costs of the Civil War: Human, Economic & Cultural

This lesson will explore the costs of the Civil War. We will examine the economic costs of the four-year conflict; its cultural costs, especially in the South; and its human costs, particularly casualties and veterans' post-war experiences.

Life in the South After the Civil War

61. Life in the South After the Civil War

Following the Civil War, the era of Reconstruction was a difficult time for Southerners. Their land was destroyed, their political institutions were overrun by outsiders, the economy was in transition and their society was in upheaval. It was in this climate that the Ku Klux Klan was born and the Redeemers sought to reestablish the Old South.

President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

62. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

Before the guns of the American Civil War fell silent, President Abraham Lincoln was making plans for the reconstruction of the South. In this lesson, learn what his plans involved and the controversy surrounding them.

President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

63. President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

When President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, the task of Reconstruction fell to President Andrew Johnson. He was soon at odds with many different factions in the nation. While Johnson was not successful in domestic policy, his administration had a few foreign successes.

The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

64. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

Congressional Reconstruction, guided by Radical Republicans, aggressively pursued political equality for African Americans as defined by several pieces of legislation and the 14th Amendment. Conflict between Congress and President Andrew Johnson escalated until he was impeached.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

65. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

66. President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

Ulysses S. Grant, the Union hero of the Civil War, was elected in 1868, the last U.S. president to have been a slave owner. Despite his popularity, the nation faced social, economic and political difficulties, and his administration was shrouded in corruption.

Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

67. Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

In this lesson, we'll explore the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on the people of the South. We'll look at rights and opportunities for African Americans, economic growth, resentment and violence, and the sharecropping system.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

68. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

The era in U.S. history known as Reconstruction presented many new opportunities to African Americans, especially in the South. For the first time, freedmen were free to pursue economic independence, education, religion and politics. These pursuits are embodied in the accomplishments of four men: Alonzo Herndon, Booker T. Washington, Jonathan Gibbs and Hiram Revels.

The Redeemers: Definition & History

69. The Redeemers: Definition & History

In this lesson, we will explore the reactions of white Southerners to Reconstruction. We will examine their grievances, discuss their sometimes violent backlash, and take a look at their political efforts to regain control of the South.

The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

70. The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

Since the end of the Civil War in 1865, Republicans had tried to Reconstruct the South and secure equal rights for African American men. But a series of factors convened to bring Reconstruction to an end in 1877.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

71. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

Whiskey Ring Scandal of 1875: History & Explanation

72. Whiskey Ring Scandal of 1875: History & Explanation

In this lesson, you'll learn about the Whiskey Ring scandal, one of the biggest controversies of Ulysses S. Grant's presidency. Discover how the liquor industry and the Treasury Department defrauded the government out of millions of dollars in unreported tax revenue.

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