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Ch 21: Chapter 21: World War I (1914-1919)

About This Chapter

The World War I chapter of this Prentice Hall America Textbook Companion course aligns with the same chapter in the Prentice Hall America textbook. These simple and fun video lessons are about five minutes long and help you learn the essential lessons of World War I.

How it works:

  • Find the lesson within this chapter that corresponds to what you're studying in the World War I chapter of your textbook.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the World War I topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quiz after watching each video lesson to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

You'll learn about all of the topics in the textbook chapter, including:

  • Causes of the Great War
  • European tensions contributing to WWI
  • U.S. position during WWI
  • Impact of U.S. involvement in the war
  • Warfare on land, in the air and at sea
  • Key WWI battles
  • Significance of the Peace of Paris
  • Economic, political and social costs of WWI

Prentice Hall America is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

8 Lessons in Chapter 21: Chapter 21: World War I (1914-1919)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

1. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

2. The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

In this lesson, we will explore the way in which Europe was a sort of 'powder keg' in the years leading up to World War I. We will examine the sources of tension among the European powers and explore how these played a role in the outbreak of World War I.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

3. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

4. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

5. World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

In this lesson, we will look specifically at the way World War I was waged on land, at sea, and in the air. We will explore how warfare was conducted within these contexts, and learn about the new technologies that made this possible.

Famous Battles of the First World War

6. Famous Battles of the First World War

In this lesson, we will learn about some of the famous battles of World War I. We will learn why these battles are important and how they affected the course of the war.

The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

7. The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

In this lesson, we will learn about the end of World War I and the Peace of Paris. We will learn what events transpired to bring about the end of the war and what provisions were laid forth in the Treaty of Versailles.

Economic, Social & Political Consequences of the Great War

8. Economic, Social & Political Consequences of the Great War

In this lesson, we will explore the consequences of World War I. We will learn about the political, economic, and social impact the war had on the United States and Europe.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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