Ch 4: Chapter 4: Atomic Structure

About This Chapter

The Atomic Structure chapter of this Prentice Hall Physical Science Companion Course helps students learn the essential physical science lessons of atomic structure. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Atomic Structure textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in Prentice Hall Physical Science's Atomic Structure chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the atomic structure topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Atoms and the three subunits
  • Identification of subatomic particles
  • Structure of the atomic nucleus
  • Early atomic theorists
  • Electron cloud theory and model
  • Bohr model of the atom
  • Difference between mass number and atomic number
  • Isotopes and atomic weight

Prentice Hall is a registered trademark of Pearson Education, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

8 Lessons in Chapter 4: Chapter 4: Atomic Structure
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Atom

1. The Atom

Tune into this lesson to find out what matters about matter. What exactly is an atom? And, how do the atoms that make up the elements in the periodic table differ from one another?

What Is a Subatomic Particle? - Definition & Mass

2. What Is a Subatomic Particle? - Definition & Mass

A subatomic particle is a particle smaller than an atom. Learn more about how to identify subatomic particles through several examples, and test your knowledge with quiz questions.

Atomic Nucleus: Definition, Structure & Size

3. Atomic Nucleus: Definition, Structure & Size

The atomic nucleus is the central part of the atom. There is a lot to be told by the structure of the atomic nucleus. This lesson goes through the structure of the atomic nucleus and other factors that the atomic nucleus tells us.

Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

4. Early Atomic Theory: Dalton, Thomson, Rutherford and Millikan

Imagine firing a bullet at a piece of tissue paper and having it bounce back at you! You would probably be just as surprised as Rutherford when he discovered the nucleus. In this lesson, we are going to travel back in time and discuss some of the major discoveries in the history of the atom.

Electron Cloud: Definition, Model & Theory

5. Electron Cloud: Definition, Model & Theory

Like the rapidly moving blades of a fan, electrons appear to occupy all of the space in an atom at once. Learn how electron location in an atom is best described by the electron cloud model and theory.

The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

6. The Bohr Model and Atomic Spectra

Do you ever wonder where light comes from or how it is produced? In this lesson, we are going to use our knowledge of the electron configurations and quantum numbers to see what goes on during the creation of light.

Atomic Number and Mass Number

7. Atomic Number and Mass Number

Atoms are the basic building blocks of everything around you. In order to really understand how atoms combine to form molecules, it's necessary to be familiar with their structure. In this lesson, we'll dissect atoms so we can see just what really goes into those little building blocks of matter.

Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

8. Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

When you drink a glass of water, you are actually drinking a combination of heavy water and light water. What's the difference? Is it harmful? This video will explain the difference between the two types of water and go into detail on the significance of the different isotopes of elements.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support