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Ch 2: Characteristics & Chemicals of Life: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Characteristics & Chemicals of Life chapter of this Middle School Life Science Homework Help course helps students complete their characteristics and chemicals of life homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your characteristics and chemicals of life homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your characteristics and chemicals of life homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Characteristics of living organisms
  • Physical and chemical properties of matter
  • States of matter
  • Parts of the atom
  • The electron cloud
  • Atomic mass and mass number
  • Formation of isotopic elements
  • Properties and groups of the periodic table
  • Relationships between elements, molecules and compounds
  • Ionic and covalent chemical bonds

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: Characteristics & Chemicals of Life: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

1. Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

Matter, or material substances, are identified based on their physical and chemical properties. Explore how this process works and learn how chemists use different properties to determine the classification of matter.

States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

2. States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, Gases & Plasma

There are four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Explore the characteristics of each state of matter and how they relate to and differ from each other.

The Atom

3. The Atom

The physical basis that everything is composed of is called matter and the smallest unit of matter is called an atom. Learn about the atom, subatomic particles, the nucleus, elements, and the periodic table.

The Electron Shell

4. The Electron Shell

An electron shell is the space surrounding a nucleus where electrons are usually found. Learn more about the electron shell, energy levels, valence electrons, and noble gases.

Atomic Number and Mass Number

5. Atomic Number and Mass Number

An atom is defined as the smallest particle of an element that displays the same properties of that element. Learn about the main components of an atom (protons, neutrons, & electrons), the characteristics of each component, and how to determine the atomic number and the mass number of an atom.

What Are Elements?

6. What Are Elements?

An element is a unique type of matter which cannot be separated into parts that are different from the initial element. Learn how elements are represented through symbols, the particles (atoms) that make up elements, and how elements can combine to create different items in the real world.

Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

7. Isotopes and Average Atomic Mass

Isotopes are variations of the same element with differing numbers of neutrons and, subsequently, different atomic masses. Learn how scientists consider isotopes when they calculate average atomic mass.

The Periodic Table: Properties of Groups and Periods

8. The Periodic Table: Properties of Groups and Periods

In the late 1800s, Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev created the periodic table by organizing elements by their atomic weight in increasing order. Learn about Mendeleev, discover how the elements on the periodic table are organized, and explore the properties of periods and groups.

Understanding the Relationships between Elements, Molecules & Compounds

9. Understanding the Relationships between Elements, Molecules & Compounds

A molecule is formed when two or more atoms from the same element are chemically bonded, whereas a compound is defined as the chemical bonding between atoms of different elements. Learn about the relationship between elements, molecules, and compounds.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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