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Ch 1: Cite Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1

About This Chapter

Find lessons for eleventh and twelfth grade English based on the Common Core Reading Literature standard for citing textual evidence (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1).

Standard: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

About This Chapter

Students who have mastered this standard will be able to read, understand, and analyze various texts such as essays, stories, and poems. With appropriate citation from the literature, students will provide evidence to support ideas and interpretations.

Lessons in this standard cover concepts such as:

  • How to analyze a literary passage
  • Determining the main points of an essay
  • Understanding inference
  • Utilizing reading strategies such as context clues, prior knowledge, cross-text comparison, and empathy
  • Considering audience
  • Deciphering meaning

Students demonstrate mastery of these concepts when independently reading and comprehending complex literature. With this mastery, students can write thoughtful, insightful papers that use textual evidence to support ideas.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Here are some tips for how to use these lessons to support instruction in the CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1 standard:

Literary Passage Analysis Lessons

Read a brief literary passage as a class. Discuss the passage and ask questions that require skills from lesson. Watch the video lesson 'How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide together. Have another class discussion incorporating concepts presented in the video. Debrief the students, having them compare and contrast their levels of understanding after acquisition of new knowledge.

Reading Strategies Lessons

Watch the lessons on reading strategies. Have students complete a worksheet in which they identify context clues and, using those clues, define specified terms.

Inference Lessons

Have students watch lessons on drawing inferences and mood in poetry. Divide the class into groups of two and assign a different poem to each group. Students will use skills from the lesson to prepare a brief presentation on the mood of the literature. Students must include at least 2 quotes from the text to support their interpretations.

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: Cite Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

2. Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

In this lesson, we learn quick rules of getting the 'gist' or point of a sentence, paragraph and essay. This skill will improve your reading speed and help you become a more effective and efficient reader and writer.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

3. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

4. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

5. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

6. Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

In this lesson, learn about two different approaches to reading a work of literature: big picture strategies and close reading strategies. Discover how these two perspectives can be put into practice through examples from the play 'Romeo and Juliet.'

Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

7. Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

In this lesson, we will discuss how to find and interpret literary meaning in writings. The lesson will focus on using the text to find key elements to guide your interpretation.

How to Determine the Best Audience or Readers for an Essay

8. How to Determine the Best Audience or Readers for an Essay

Who should be reading this? Not every essay can be enjoyed by everyone equally. How do you know who is the best target for an essay? This lesson will help you figure that out.

How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

9. How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

With diligence and intrepid ingenuity, you can use context to ascertain the purport of a word. In other words, in this lesson, we'll find out how to use context to figure out what words mean.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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