Ch 1: Citing Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1

About This Chapter

By using this chapter in your classroom, you'll make sure your 7th graders meet the requirements for the Common Core for properly citing textual evidence in books. Provided are suggestions on how to use these lessons in your classroom and how to recognize when your students have mastered the material.

Standard: Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1)

About This Chapter

After watching lessons on citing textual evidence, students will be able to analyze texts and properly cite their arguments. Your students will also learn about literary movements to further their ability to analyze and cite classroom texts. These lessons cover the following concepts:

  • Understanding major literary periods and movements
  • Analyzing literary passages
  • Using textual evidence to interpret literary meaning
  • Inferring intended meaning in a text
  • Citing textual evidence to support analysis
  • Developing strategies for citing textual evidence

You'll recognize when your students have learned and retained the lesson concepts when they're able to take a literary passage and offer a thoughtful analysis, using properly cited textual evidence to support their analyses.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Below are a few suggestions on how you can incorporate these lessons into your regular curriculum so you can meet the Common Core standards.

Screen a Video in Class

When class begins, start out by showing a video and following up with a class discussion. For example, you can screen the 'How to Analyze a Literary Passage' video to give an overview and a step-by-step method for analyzing literary passages. Follow up with a text passage from a book your class is reading and hold an open discussion to analyze it.

Assign Quizzes as Homework

After having the class learn the day's lesson, you can assign the video's accompanying quiz as homework, reminding the students that they can watch the video again at home if they need to go over the material more.

Have an In-Class Pop Quiz

Use the chapter exam as a pop quiz after screening all the lessons. Depending on how your students retained the information, you can move on to another Common Core standard or assign videos if they need to go over the material again.

6 Lessons in Chapter 1: Citing Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Overview of Literary Periods and Movements: A Historical Crash Course

1. Overview of Literary Periods and Movements: A Historical Crash Course

When it comes to studying literature, there's about 1500 years of it to take in - and that's just in the English language! Fortunately, you can check out our crash course of key literary movements to see how the art form has developed over time.

How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

2. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

3. Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

In this lesson, we will discuss how to find and interpret literary meaning in writings. The lesson will focus on using the text to find key elements to guide your interpretation.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

4. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis of the Text

5. Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis of the Text

This lesson will discuss what textual evidence is and why it is important to use it when analyzing a text. We will also discuss ways to cite textual evidence when analyzing a text to better support your claims.

Citing Textual Evidence: Strategies & Examples

6. Citing Textual Evidence: Strategies & Examples

This lesson will show you how to avoid plagiarism by citing sources. We will look at several reasons why writers use quotes and how to integrate explicit evidence into an argument. Then, we will explore formats, footnotes, and bibliographies.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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