Ch 11: Civil Disobedience From 1954-1973: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Civil Disobedience from 1954-1973 chapter of this Post-Civil War U.S. History Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of civil disobedience from 1954-1973. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of civil disobedience from 1954-1973.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help understanding material from Post-Civil War U.S. History will benefit from taking this course. You will be able to grasp the subject matter faster, retain critical knowledge longer and earn better grades. You're in the right place if you:

  • Have fallen behind in understanding civil rights movements or civil disobedience from 1954-1973.
  • Need an efficient way to learn about civil disobedience from 1954-1973.
  • Learn best with engaging auditory and visual tools.
  • Struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD.
  • Experience difficulty understanding your teachers.
  • Missed class time and need to catch up.
  • Can't access extra history resources at school.

How it works:

  • Start at the beginning, or identify the topics that you need help with.
  • Watch and learn from fun videos, reviewing as needed.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Submit questions to one of our instructors for personalized support if you need extra help.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Civil Disobedience from 1954-1973 chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Civil Disobedience from 1954-1973 chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any relevant question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to questions including:

  • What was Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society program?
  • How did the civil rights movement evolve during the 1950s and 1960s?
  • Who were the hippies, and what were their countercultural beliefs?
  • How did the student movement of the 1960s begin?
  • Why was 1968 such an important year in history?
  • How did the women's and other activist movements affect America?

17 Lessons in Chapter 11: Civil Disobedience From 1954-1973: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society Program

1. President Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society Program

President Lyndon B. Johnson created the Great Society program in 1964, to end poverty and racial injustice in the United States. Study the attempt to continue the initiative of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt and why it didn't work.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

2. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1950s

In the 1950s, the U.S. Civil Rights movement sought to put an end to racial discrimination in the country. Learn about the movement's historical context, the revitalization, and the opposition to the movement during the 1950s.

The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

3. The Civil Rights Movement During the 1960s

There were many events that spurred the Civil Rights Movement forward during the 1960s. Explore the historic success of the Civil Rights Movement and the violence that fractured the movement.

Hippies and the Counterculture: Origins, Beliefs and Legacy

4. Hippies and the Counterculture: Origins, Beliefs and Legacy

Understand the concept of counterculture. Explore the roles of Beats and Hippies in the lifestyle, politics, and downfall of the counterculture generation.

The Student Movement of the 1960s

5. The Student Movement of the 1960s

The student movement of the 1960s was formed by college students who wanted to end the conformist culture of the 50s. Study the origins, rise of the New Left, how racial injustice was tackled, campus revolts, Vietnam War protests, and why it ended.

1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

6. 1968: The Year that Changed the Nation

The year 1968 started with the Tet Offensive in Vietnam and ended with the election of Richard Nixon, never seeming to have a subtle moment between those events. Learn about how the year 1968 changed the nation with the war in Southeast Asia, domestic clashes over racial equality and war, along with fallen leaders such as Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.

The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

7. The Women's Movement: Causes, Campaigns & Impacts on the US

The women's movement of the 1960s was composed of three campaigns: liberal feminism, radical feminism, and conservative feminism. Learn about the causes of second-wave feminism and explore how the battle for equal rights impacted the United States.

Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

8. Other Important Activist Movements of the Late 60s and Early 70s

The 1960s and 70s were rife with historical activist movements. Discover the impact of the Red Power movement, the Brown Power movement, and other notable crusades for equality that you may recognize even in modern politics.

1950s Discrimination Against Native Americans & Latinx Americans

9. 1950s Discrimination Against Native Americans & Latinx Americans

Racial discrimination was reflected in the abuse of Native American and Latinx populations throughout the 1950s. Learn the manifestation of discrimination against these groups alongside the events leading up to the Civil Rights Movement.

Juvenile Delinquency in the 1950s

10. Juvenile Delinquency in the 1950s

After World War II ended and soldiers returned home, the 1950s became a decade of increasing wealth for American families. Discover how the pursuit of fun and independence by teenagers during this era caused tension and societal problems like juvenile delinquency.

Lyndon Johnson's Path to the Presidency

11. Lyndon Johnson's Path to the Presidency

Already a powerful senator from Texas when elected vice-president in 1960, Lyndon Johnson rode a steady path to elected office from relative obscurity. Explore Johnson's rapid transformation from a school teacher to a politico, his tenure in the House of Representatives, service in WWII, his career as a United States Senator, and his relationship with President John F. Kennedy.

The Civil Rights Act of 1957: History & Significance

12. The Civil Rights Act of 1957: History & Significance

The Civil Rights Act of 1957 preceded the landmark legislation passed in 1964 and sought, among other things, to eliminate poll taxes intended to make it harder for blacks to vote. Learn about the history of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, the language of the bill and the significance of it, court cases that followed, and outrage on part of Southerns like Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.

Race Riots in the 1960s

13. Race Riots in the 1960s

The Race Riots of the Civil Rights movement were violent incidents of racial tension erupting between demonstrators and opposing groups. Identify the social conditions leading to the riots, the events of 1964, and riots in 1967 and 1968.

The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

14. The Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

As he was regarded as the face of the civil rights movement, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. stunned the world. Learn about the aftermath of the assassination, including riots, a manhunt for King's killer, and the lasting legacy of King's death.

Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

15. Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

Civil rights movements paved the way for the future of social progression, and we still build on those ideologies today. Learn more about 'Brown v. the Board of Education,' affirmative action and state, and civil rights initiatives regarding housing, voting, and school transportation.

What is Segregation? - Definition, Facts & Timeline

16. What is Segregation? - Definition, Facts & Timeline

Through this lesson you will learn what defines segregation in society, how it worked in American culture, and gain an understanding of how it evolved and ultimately came to an end.

Civil Religion in America: Definition & Overview

17. Civil Religion in America: Definition & Overview

This lesson discusses the role of civil religion and looks at what has influenced this concept in the United States. You will consider the impact of seeing your culture as exceptional, including the problems that can result.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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