Copyright

Ch 5: Civil Liberties in American Government Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Civil Liberties in American Government chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach civil liberties in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Civil Liberties in American Government chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

DayTopicsKey Terms and Concepts Covered
MondayOrigin of civil liberties in the U.S.Overview of the development of civil rights, including the The Bill of Rights
Tuesday Freedom of speech, press and assembly
Freedom of religion
Definition of freedom of speech, press and assembly and how these rights are limited in some ways;
History of freedom of religion in the U.S., clauses that mandate religious freedom
WednesdayRights of the accusedOverview of the rights granted to someone accused of a crime
Thursday Privacy rights
Right to bear arms
Rights of privacy in regards to certain types of behavior, privacy rights and technology;
Overview of the controversy surrounding the Second Amendment
Friday The court's role in deciding civil libertiesHow court decisions play a role in establishing civil liberties, with examples

7 Lessons in Chapter 5: Civil Liberties in American Government Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Origins of Civil Liberties in the United States: History & Timeline

1. Origins of Civil Liberties in the United States: History & Timeline

In this lesson, we will learn about the origin of civil liberties in the United States. We will take a closer look at where the civil liberties came from, what they entail and what they mean to society today.

Freedom of Speech, Press & Assembly: Definition, Importance & Limitations

2. Freedom of Speech, Press & Assembly: Definition, Importance & Limitations

In this lesson, we will learn about the freedom of speech, press and assembly. We will take a closer look at the rationale behind these freedoms and the specific clauses of freedom of speech, press and assembly and what they mean to society today.

What is Freedom of Religion? - Definition, History & Importance

3. What is Freedom of Religion? - Definition, History & Importance

In this lesson, we will learn about the freedom of religion. We will take a closer look at the rationale behind the freedom, the specific clauses of the freedom of religion and what it means to society today.

Law and Order: Procedural Rights of the Accused

4. Law and Order: Procedural Rights of the Accused

In this lesson, we will learn about the procedural rights of the accused. We will look at how these rights are defined and what they mean to our justice system today.

The Right to Privacy: Definition & Examples

5. The Right to Privacy: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will learn about the right of privacy. We will take a closer look at the right, what it includes and what it means to society today.

The Right to Bear Arms: History, Pros & Cons

6. The Right to Bear Arms: History, Pros & Cons

In this lesson, we will learn about the right to bear arms. We will take a closer look at the right to find out what it includes and what it means to society today.

The Courts and a Free Society: Role in Deciding Civil Liberties

7. The Courts and a Free Society: Role in Deciding Civil Liberties

In this lesson, we will learn about the origin of the court's role with civil liberties in the United States. We will take a closer look at what the court's positions entail and the effects on society today.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support