Ch 8: Civil Rights & Liberties

About This Chapter

You can learn important topics on U.S. civil rights and liberties by going through the lessons you'll find included in this chapter. Review these lessons to learn basic topics on the history and politics of civil rights in the United States.

Civil Rights & Liberties - Chapter Summary

Anyone who wishes to get a comprehensive picture of American history and civics should ensure that he or she pays attention to issues involving civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. This chapter contains several text and video lessons that will teach you about different topics needed to fully understand the history and politics of civil rights and liberties in the context of American history.

Our lesson instructors will guide you through each topic, going over some of the most significant issues in civil rights jurisprudence in the United States, as well as notable historical moments that helped define the current American concept of civil rights and liberties. Each lesson instructor has expertise teaching these very topics, so all information you receive will be accurate and up-to-date. Specific topics you will learn about include:

  • The definition and examples of civil liberties
  • History and overview of the Civil Rights Movement
  • The Fourteenth Amendment
  • Separation of church and state
  • Contemporary civil rights debates

Each video contains tags that will help you locate the specific moments in that particular lesson corresponding to the topic's main points. If you would like to read over a hard copy of the lessons, the chapter also provides you with complete transcripts of each video. Make sure that you use your personal Dashboard to keep track of your learning progress once you complete the chapter.

12 Lessons in Chapter 8: Civil Rights & Liberties
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What are Civil Liberties? - Definition, Examples & Cases

1. What are Civil Liberties? - Definition, Examples & Cases

What are civil liberties? How are they different from civil rights? How do we know exactly what (and when) they are? The issue of civil liberties began with the Constitution and continues with the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Origins of Civil Rights: History & Overview

2. The Origins of Civil Rights: History & Overview

Most people know that a major victory for civil rights was won when the slaves were freed after the American Civil War, but that was just the beginning. In this lesson, we'll look at civil rights and the Civil Rights Movement in America.

Origins of Civil Liberties in the United States: History & Timeline

3. Origins of Civil Liberties in the United States: History & Timeline

In this lesson, we will learn about the origin of civil liberties in the United States. We will take a closer look at where the civil liberties came from, what they entail and what they mean to society today.

Equal Protection Under The Fourteenth Amendment: Definition & Summary

4. Equal Protection Under The Fourteenth Amendment: Definition & Summary

In this lesson, we will learn about the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. We will take a closer look at the history behind this clause, what it contains and what it means to society today.

Civil Liberties Debates in the U.S. in the 2000s

5. Civil Liberties Debates in the U.S. in the 2000s

The 21st century is less than 20 years old- how many debates can we possibly have accumulated in that time? A lot. In this lesson, we'll explore issues of civil liberties in the United States since the year 2000.

Civil Rights Debates in the U.S. in the 2000s

6. Civil Rights Debates in the U.S. in the 2000s

Civil rights debates have been an evolving part of the American story since the country was founded. Let's look at some of the more recent civil rights debates that have occurred since the turn of the century.

Separation of Church & State: Definition, History, Pros & Cons

7. Separation of Church & State: Definition, History, Pros & Cons

Today, we will learn about the separation of church and state, consider its history, and weigh the pros and cons. This lesson focuses on the American context and is useful to better understand the political and legal complications of this issue.

The Establishment Clause: Definition & Cases

8. The Establishment Clause: Definition & Cases

The 1st Amendment guarantees not one, but two rights about religion in U.S. society--the 'free exercise clause' and the 'establishment clause.' The latter establishes a 'wall of separation' between church and state; though over the last two centuries and a variety of court cases, the wall has become a more porous barrier.

What is the Civil Rights Act of 1964? - Summary, Effects & Impact

9. What is the Civil Rights Act of 1964? - Summary, Effects & Impact

This lesson discusses the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as well as the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Learn more about the history and impact of these landmark pieces of legislation.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965: Definition, Summary & Facts

10. The Voting Rights Act of 1965: Definition, Summary & Facts

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 provided protection for minorities against discriminatory practices in voting. We'll consider its historical background, its provisions, its amendments, and its recent interpretation by the Supreme Court.

The Impact of the Fair Housing Act of 1968 on Real Estate

11. The Impact of the Fair Housing Act of 1968 on Real Estate

Federal fair housing laws prohibit certain types of discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. In this lesson, you'll learn about the Fair Housing Act of 1968 and its amendments and exemptions.

Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

12. Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed more than 50 years ago, but still its effects, and the effects of later programs, are felt today. That said, the intervening years have been far from perfect in the pursuit of real civil rights.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support