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Ch 11: Classification of Drugs

About This Chapter

Use the lessons in this chapter to learn about the different classifications of drugs. After viewing the videos, you can use the corresponding self-assessment quizzes to check your proficiency.

Classification of Drugs - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Drugs in the United States are categorized into five classifications, or schedules. This chapter will teach you about the different drug schedules and the qualifications for a drug to be included in each one. Watch the short, engaging videos to learn why drugs are classified, and then use the multiple-choice quizzes to check your understanding of the material. These lessons cover the following:

  • How drugs are classified
  • The five drug schedules
  • Common drugs on each of the schedules

Video Objective
Types of Drugs: Classifications & Effects Identify different types of drugs, their classifications, and effects.
How and Why Are Drugs Classified? See an overview of the qualities used to categorize drugs.
Schedule I Drug Classification & Drug List Learn about common types of Schedule I drugs.
Schedule II Drug Classification & Drug List See qualities of Schedule II drugs.
Schedule III Drug Classification & Drug List Explore drugs on the Schedule III list.
Schedule IV Drug Classification & Drug List Examine the qualifications to be listed as a Schedule IV drug.
Schedule V Drug Classification & Drug List Study traits of Schedule V drugs.

7 Lessons in Chapter 11: Classification of Drugs
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Types of Drugs: Classifications & Effects

1. Types of Drugs: Classifications & Effects

This lesson will describe the six major classes of psychoactive drugs, give examples of substances in each class, and explain what they cause a person to experience in the short-term and the long-term.

How and Why Are Drugs Classified?

2. How and Why Are Drugs Classified?

In the United States, controlled substances are classified according to their medicinal value and potential for abuse. The classifications are known as ''schedules.'' This lesson explains how and why drugs are classified.

Schedule I Drug Classification & Drug List

3. Schedule I Drug Classification & Drug List

United States law requires drugs to be classified into five separate schedules. A drug's schedule is determined by the drug's acceptable medical use and its potential for abuse. This lesson looks at the Schedule I drug classification.

Schedule II Drug Classification & Drug List

4. Schedule II Drug Classification & Drug List

The Controlled Substances Act requires drugs to be sorted into five separate schedules. A drug's schedule reflects the drug's acceptable medical use and its potential for addiction and abuse. This lesson explains the Schedule II drug class.

Schedule III Drug Classification & Drug List

5. Schedule III Drug Classification & Drug List

Since the enactment of the Controlled Substances Act in 1970, drugs have been categorized into five separate schedules. For the most part, the schedules range from most to least dangerous. This lesson explains the Schedule III drug class.

Schedule IV Drug Classification & Drug List

6. Schedule IV Drug Classification & Drug List

Controlled substances are categorized into five separate 'schedules.' By and large, the schedules range from the most dangerous drugs to the least dangerous. This lesson explains the Schedule IV drug class.

Schedule V Drug Classification & Drug List

7. Schedule V Drug Classification & Drug List

The 'drug schedules' are used to classify controlled substances. The five schedules categorize controlled substances according to their medicinal value and risk of abuse. This lesson explains the Schedule V drug class.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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