Ch 14: Client History & Assessment for Social Workers

About This Chapter

This chapter gives you a complete review of how to create a comprehensive intake status for a new client in social work. You'll look at interviewing, observation, and assessments through a series of fun lessons.

Client History & Assessment for Social Workers - Chapter Summary

The chapter begins with a lesson on the first step in social work - obtaining a client's history. From there, you'll look at the components and function of the mental status exam, and the counseling intake process and initial interview. By the end of the chapter you will be able to:

  • Assess a client's ego strengths using formative, summative, and/or outcomes assessments
  • Explain the methodology and techniques of behavioral interviewing
  • Define and give examples of naturalistic observation in psychology
  • Explore the dimensions of psychopathology in mental health
  • Give the definitions and examples of the biopsychosocial model and biopsychosocial interview
  • Assess the psychodynamic model's strengths and weaknesses
  • Review the purpose, process, and limitations of clinical interviews in psychological assessment

This jam-packed chapter was carefully created by our professional instructors to be easily used and understood by busy people who need efficient study time. As you go through each self-paced lesson, you can take advantage of as much or as little of the available materials as you need. You can gauge your progress by completing the chapter-end test, and monitor it on your Dashboard.

13 Lessons in Chapter 14: Client History & Assessment for Social Workers
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Obtaining a Client's History in Social Work

1. Obtaining a Client's History in Social Work

In this lesson, you will learn how social workers gain information about a client's history, including the client's physical and mental health issues and significant life events, as well as how social workers can use a client's history in providing therapy.

Mental Status Examination: Components & Function

2. Mental Status Examination: Components & Function

How is a client first assessed to create a baseline for further assessment? This lesson looks at the mental status examination, discusses what it is, what elements make up the exam and how it is used.

The Counseling Intake Process & Initial Interview

3. The Counseling Intake Process & Initial Interview

We will look at the counseling intake process as a person who is entering in counseling. Each step will be explained by a process we are all familiar with: medical doctor's office visits.

Assessing a Client's Ego Strengths in Social Work

4. Assessing a Client's Ego Strengths in Social Work

Knowing how to identify a client's ego strengths can prove to be a vital determinant of how well a client will cope with painful life situations. Learn the definition of ego strength, as well as 15 examples of ego strengths, in this lesson.

Formative Assessment in Social Work

5. Formative Assessment in Social Work

What happens if a program or a social work client is not up to par? This lesson discusses the use of formative assessment in social work, how it can affect clients progress, and how it can be used to assess programs.

Summative Assessment in Social Work

6. Summative Assessment in Social Work

How does a social worker evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention after it has been given? This lesson looks at summative assessment and how it can help social workers provide better service.

Behavioral Interviewing: Methodology & Techniques

7. Behavioral Interviewing: Methodology & Techniques

We will explore the various types of questions used in behavioral interviewing and the best way to answer them. After reading this, you will be prepared to conduct or participate in a behavioral health interview.

Naturalistic Observation in Psychology: Definition & Examples

8. Naturalistic Observation in Psychology: Definition & Examples

Many different research methodologies are used in psychology. So many approaches exist because psychologists are interested in a wide range of topics. The least invasive of these methods is called naturalistic observation.

Mental Health & Psychopathology: Definition & Dimensions

9. Mental Health & Psychopathology: Definition & Dimensions

In this lesson, we will explore some of the basic ways that we differentiate between mental health and psychopathology. Included in this is looking at social, behavioral, thought, and emotional processes.

What is the Biopsychosocial Model? - Definition & Example

10. What is the Biopsychosocial Model? - Definition & Example

The biopsychosocial model is a tool that psychologists use to examine how psychological disorders develop. This lesson will provide a definition of this model and provide specific examples to illustrate how it can be used.

Biopsychosocial Interview: Definition & Uses in Counseling

11. Biopsychosocial Interview: Definition & Uses in Counseling

In order to fully understand a client's problems, a therapist can conduct a biopsychosocial interview that assesses the client on three different dimensions: biological, psychological, and social. In this lesson, learn about the biopsychosocial interview with sample scenarios and interview questions.

Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

12. Assessing the Psychodynamic Model: Strengths and Weaknesses

When people think about psychology, many immediately think of Sigmund Freud. But, how good were his ideas? In this lesson, we'll look at the psychodynamic model of psychology and its strengths and weaknesses.

Clinical Interviews in Psychological Assessment: Purpose, Process, & Limitations

13. Clinical Interviews in Psychological Assessment: Purpose, Process, & Limitations

Psychologists are not mind-readers. Like medical doctors, psychologists have to assess their patients to find out what's wrong. In this lesson, we'll examine the most commonly used psychological assessment: the clinical interview.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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