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Ch 5: Cognitive Perspective in Psychology: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Cognitive Perspective in Psychology chapter of this Educational Psychology Help and Review course is the simplest way to master cognitive perspective in psychology. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of cognitive perspective in psychology.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering educational psychology material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn educational psychology. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding types of information transfer or problem solving strategies
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning psychology (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about cognitive perspective in psychology
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra psychology learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Cognitive Perspective in Psychology chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Cognitive Perspective in Psychology chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any cognitive perspective question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a cognitive perspective in psychology unit of a standard educational psychology course. Topics covered include:

  • The two-store model of memory
  • Memory categorization
  • Short-term memory
  • Long-term memory retrieval
  • Types of information transfer
  • Creativity and brainstorming
  • Types of problems

40 Lessons in Chapter 5: Cognitive Perspective in Psychology: Help and Review
Cognitive Perspective of Learning & Information Processing

1. Cognitive Perspective of Learning & Information Processing

When you see or hear something in your environment, how does your brain recognize what you are seeing or hearing? This lesson introduces the cognitive perspective in psychology, including the difference between sensation and perception. We'll also discuss the famous Gestalt principles of perception that you do automatically every day but didn't necessarily know there were names for what your brain was doing.

The Two-Store Model of Memory: Types of Memory and Storage

2. The Two-Store Model of Memory: Types of Memory and Storage

Do you remember your first day of school? This lesson discusses the foundational concepts behind all memories, including basic types of memory and the process all memories must go through for success: encoding, storage and retrieval.

Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

3. Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

Did you know that there are several types of memories? How does your brain keep track of them all? In this lesson, as you observe your surroundings at an art museum, you'll come to understand how your brain categorizes memory so you can remember your experiences.

Short-Term Memory: How STM Works

4. Short-Term Memory: How STM Works

All memories must first pass through short-term memory (STM) before becoming permanent. But how does STM really work? This lesson covers several aspects of STM, including why it seems to be an auditory-based system, how much information can be stored and the serial position curve.

Improving Retrieval of Memories: Mnemonic Devices

5. Improving Retrieval of Memories: Mnemonic Devices

When you have to study for a test and you need to remember a large amount of information, what strategies do you use to help your memory? These strategies are called mnemonic devices. This lesson covers several well-known mnemonic devices, such as chunking, the method of loci and the keyword technique.

Retrieving Long-Term Memories: Interference, Amnesia & State-Dependent Memory

6. Retrieving Long-Term Memories: Interference, Amnesia & State-Dependent Memory

Have you ever been sure that you know something but simply can't pull it out of your memory? This frustrating experience is a lack of retrieval, and this lesson discusses several aspects of successful retrieval, including retroactive and proactive interference, state-dependent memory and different forms of amnesia.

Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

7. Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

How does your mind organize the world? When you see a new animal, can you easily tell if it's a bird, mammal or fish? Categories and mental structures, such as types of animals, are called schemata. This lesson discusses different types of schemata and why they are important.

Types of Information Transfer

8. Types of Information Transfer

When you acquire one skill, does that ability help or hurt your ability to learn other skills? For example, learning to play the guitar might help you learn to play the banjo, but it probably doesn't affect your ability to learn the geography of Africa. This lesson focuses on transfer of information, including positive, negative and zero transfer, as well as the difference between high-road and low-road transfer of information.

Cognitive Thinking: Creativity, Brainstorming and Convergent & Divergent Thinking

9. Cognitive Thinking: Creativity, Brainstorming and Convergent & Divergent Thinking

Creativity is useful in almost any situation, but how is creativity defined? This lesson covers the definition of creativity and discusses how creativity requires several different types of thinking, including divergent thinking and synthetic, analytic, and practical intelligence. This lesson also defines and describes brainstorming.

How to Advance Creativity in a Learning Environment

10. How to Advance Creativity in a Learning Environment

Students in a classroom can attempt to solve problems in a wide variety of creative ways. This lesson defines creativity and then covers barriers to thinking creatively, including response sets and functional fixedness. Finally, the lesson discusses different types of creative problem solving, including brainstorming and working backward.

Types of Problems & Problem Solving Strategies

11. Types of Problems & Problem Solving Strategies

We solve hundreds of small problems everyday. This lesson covers different types of problems, such as routine vs. non-routine, and many of the different problem-solving strategies we use, including algorithms, heuristics, graphic representations and the IDEAL Strategy.

Top-Down Processing: Examples & Definition

12. Top-Down Processing: Examples & Definition

In this lesson, you will learn to define top-down processing. Two examples will be provided to help you better understand the concept as it applies to everyday situations. Following completion of this lesson, you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge with a short quiz.

What is Educational Bias?- Definition & Types

13. What is Educational Bias?- Definition & Types

A sad fact of life is that, sometimes, not all people are treated the same. This happens everywhere, even in educational settings. What does this look like and where does it happen? Complete this lesson to learn about bias in education.

What is Bias? - Definition & Types

14. What is Bias? - Definition & Types

Through this lesson, you will learn how to define bias and explore a brief introduction to some of the types that exist in psychology and the social sciences. When you are through with the lesson, you can test your new knowledge with a short quiz.

Convergent Thinking: Definition & Examples

15. Convergent Thinking: Definition & Examples

Convergent thinking is a term used to describe the process of finding a single best solution to a problem. Learn about convergent thinking, how it differs from divergent thinking, and more.

Cognitive Map: Definition and Examples

16. Cognitive Map: Definition and Examples

Cognitive maps are mental images of the attributes of our environment. Learn more about cognitive maps from examples. Then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Functional Fixedness in Psychology: Definition & Examples

17. Functional Fixedness in Psychology: Definition & Examples

How does looking at a coin or a box of matches demonstrate the inability to think creatively? In this lesson, we'll examine functional fixedness, a cognitive bias that can prevent creative thinking and problem-solving, and how to overcome it.

Bell Ringer Activity Ideas for Science Classes

18. Bell Ringer Activity Ideas for Science Classes

Expand your idea of a bell ringer in the science classroom. Although you can use traditional, individual seatwork, there are other options that will make your bell ringer activities more interactive and productive in the learning process.

Brain Teasers for High School Students

19. Brain Teasers for High School Students

This lesson will stress the benefits of using brain teasers in the high school classroom and offers examples of several different types of brain teasers that are appropriate for high school students.

Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency

20. Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency

In this lesson, you will learn about cognitive academic language proficiency, how it affects student learning, and what can be done to improve student outcomes. An example is provided and a short quiz follows.

Critical Thinking Word Problems

21. Critical Thinking Word Problems

In this lesson you'll learn the art of crafting a question that inspires different levels of critical thinking. We'll cover a basic definition for critical thinking and a five level system for word problems. A short quiz follows.

Financial Literacy Games for Students

22. Financial Literacy Games for Students

In this lesson we'll explore ways to utilize game-based learning to help students gain greater financial literacy. A listing of quality financial literacy games is provided and a short quiz follows the lesson.

Geometry in the Real World Project Ideas

23. Geometry in the Real World Project Ideas

Geometry is a branch of math that lends itself nicely to project-based learning. This lesson will give teachers of different age groups ideas for how they can incorporate projects to show the relevance of geometry in the real world.

Higher Level Thinking Questions for Reading

24. Higher Level Thinking Questions for Reading

Educational trends encourage the process of metacognition, or understanding one's own thinking. This requires a teacher to develop higher-level thinking questions. This lesson will help educators reach fluency in developing these kinds of questions.

How to Improve Study Skills

25. How to Improve Study Skills

This lesson will help you better understand how to improve your study skills. It includes certain steps you can take to enhance your study habits, as well as a mnemonic device to help you recall important note-taking skills.

Language Arts Bell Ringers

26. Language Arts Bell Ringers

Starting a new class every period can sometimes be a stressful and hectic experience. This lesson covers bell ringer activities for language arts, such as journaling and daily trivia, that will help your students get settled and ready to work.

Marketing Games for Students

27. Marketing Games for Students

Marketing is an important skill for students to learn, regardless of what field of study or work they are hoping to pursue. This lesson will give you some fun and engaging activities to help you teach your students about marketing.

One-Way Communication: Definition & Examples

28. One-Way Communication: Definition & Examples

We often think of communication as a back-and-forth process; however, communication doesn't have to be a two-way street. We'll explore the definition of one-way communication, as well as look at some examples.

Reading Bell Ringers

29. Reading Bell Ringers

Reading Bell Ringers can help teachers manage times of transition within a classroom by providing students a structured and engaging activity. In this lesson, you will learn multiple examples of Reading Bell Ringers that you can use in your classroom.

Science Bell Ringers

30. Science Bell Ringers

Bell ringers are useful for helping students get settled into class at the beginning of the period. This lesson will provide several different kinds of science bell ringers you can use to help your students get ready to learn.

Social Studies Bell Ringers

31. Social Studies Bell Ringers

The purpose of a bell ringer activity can be to pre-assess students' knowledge or to review already taught skills. In this lesson you will be introduced to five different bell ringers for use in a social-studies/history classroom.

Table of Contents: Examples and Format

32. Table of Contents: Examples and Format

This lesson explains the importance of a table of contents and gives examples of some common formats. Following the lesson, a short quiz will test your knowledge.

Teaching with Film in High School

33. Teaching with Film in High School

Films can be a great resource to use in order to increase students' comprehension of subject-matter concepts. This lesson will discuss ways in which film can be taught to students in high school with a short quiz to follow that will test your knowledge.

Teaching Kids to Program

34. Teaching Kids to Program

In this lesson, we'll cover some basic methods of introducing kids to programming and a few tools to allow them to build their programming confidence. A short quiz follows the lesson.

Teaching Visual Literacy

35. Teaching Visual Literacy

This lesson will cover the basics of visual literacy and why it is a necessary skill. Included are some recommended tools for teaching visual literacy in the classroom. A short quiz follows the lesson.

Understanding and Teaching the Digital Generation

36. Understanding and Teaching the Digital Generation

Teaching in the 21st century means that your students belong to the digital generation. These students learn in different ways and this lesson will help you teach and understand them better.

Using PowerPoint in the Classroom

37. Using PowerPoint in the Classroom

In this lesson, we'll cover some basic tips for how to successfully use Microsoft PowerPoint in your classroom. Instructions on how to design quality slides, presentation keys, and a few neat tricks are included herein. A short quiz follows.

What Are Liberal Arts? - Definition, Subjects & Importance

38. What Are Liberal Arts? - Definition, Subjects & Importance

Why do almost all students, no matter their degree path, have to take history, English and art courses? While the liberal arts do not train students for a specialized career path, these courses provide students with an invaluable skill set that will make them more marketable in today's tough job market.

George Kelly: Theory & Biography

39. George Kelly: Theory & Biography

George Kelly was an American psychologist whose work helped to shape modern mental health treatment. Through this lesson, you will explore a brief biography on Kelly and learn some of the specifics of his personal construct theory.

The Importance of Visual Perception in Cognitive Processes

40. The Importance of Visual Perception in Cognitive Processes

The cognitive processes that are so important in learning can be significantly impacted with poor visual perception. Learn about the five cognitive processes that are impacted by visual perception in this lesson.

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