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Ch 5: Cognitive Perspective in Psychology: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The Cognitive Perspective in Psychology chapter of this Educational Psychology Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the cognitive perspective in psychology. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the essential concepts related to the cognitive perspective in psychology required in a typical educational psychology course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other educational psychology work.
  • Identify the cognitive perspective concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our educational psychology tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn the cognitive perspective in psychology and earn better grades. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding short-term memory, knowledge organization, problem-solving strategies or any other cognitive perspective topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their psychology learning
  • Prefer learning psychology visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their cognitive perspective in psychology unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in educational psychology
  • Don't have access to their psychology teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning the cognitive perspective in psychology simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live psychology tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn the cognitive perspective in psychology on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the cognitive perspective of learning and information processing.
  • Discuss the two-store model of memory.
  • Learn how memories are categorized.
  • Explain how short-term memory works.
  • Describe how the use of mnemonic devices can improve memory retrieval.
  • Take a look at factors that can interfere with long-term memory retrieval.
  • Understand how knowledge is organized.
  • Examine different types of information transfer.
  • Learn the difference between convergent and divergent thinking.
  • Discuss barriers to creativity.
  • List various types of problem solving strategies.

39 Lessons in Chapter 5: Cognitive Perspective in Psychology: Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Cognitive Perspective of Learning & Information Processing

1. Cognitive Perspective of Learning & Information Processing

When you see or hear something in your environment, how does your brain recognize what you are seeing or hearing? This lesson introduces the cognitive perspective in psychology, including the difference between sensation and perception. We'll also discuss the famous Gestalt principles of perception that you do automatically every day but didn't necessarily know there were names for what your brain was doing.

The Two-Store Model of Memory: Types of Memory and Storage

2. The Two-Store Model of Memory: Types of Memory and Storage

Do you remember your first day of school? This lesson discusses the foundational concepts behind all memories, including basic types of memory and the process all memories must go through for success: encoding, storage and retrieval.

Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

3. Categories of Memory: Sensory & Long-Term

Did you know that there are several types of memories? How does your brain keep track of them all? In this lesson, as you observe your surroundings at an art museum, you'll come to understand how your brain categorizes memory so you can remember your experiences.

Short-Term Memory: How STM Works

4. Short-Term Memory: How STM Works

All memories must first pass through short-term memory (STM) before becoming permanent. But how does STM really work? This lesson covers several aspects of STM, including why it seems to be an auditory-based system, how much information can be stored and the serial position curve.

Improving Retrieval of Memories: Mnemonic Devices

5. Improving Retrieval of Memories: Mnemonic Devices

When you have to study for a test and you need to remember a large amount of information, what strategies do you use to help your memory? These strategies are called mnemonic devices. This lesson covers several well-known mnemonic devices, such as chunking, the method of loci and the keyword technique.

Retrieving Long-Term Memories: Interference, Amnesia & State-Dependent Memory

6. Retrieving Long-Term Memories: Interference, Amnesia & State-Dependent Memory

Have you ever been sure that you know something but simply can't pull it out of your memory? This frustrating experience is a lack of retrieval, and this lesson discusses several aspects of successful retrieval, including retroactive and proactive interference, state-dependent memory and different forms of amnesia.

Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

7. Knowledge Organization: Schemata and Scripts

How does your mind organize the world? When you see a new animal, can you easily tell if it's a bird, mammal or fish? Categories and mental structures, such as types of animals, are called schemata. This lesson discusses different types of schemata and why they are important.

Types of Information Transfer

8. Types of Information Transfer

When you acquire one skill, does that ability help or hurt your ability to learn other skills? For example, learning to play the guitar might help you learn to play the banjo, but it probably doesn't affect your ability to learn the geography of Africa. This lesson focuses on transfer of information, including positive, negative and zero transfer, as well as the difference between high-road and low-road transfer of information.

Cognitive Thinking: Creativity, Brainstorming and Convergent & Divergent Thinking

9. Cognitive Thinking: Creativity, Brainstorming and Convergent & Divergent Thinking

Creativity is useful in almost any situation, but how is creativity defined? This lesson covers the definition of creativity and discusses how creativity requires several different types of thinking, including divergent thinking and synthetic, analytic, and practical intelligence. This lesson also defines and describes brainstorming.

How to Advance Creativity in a Learning Environment

10. How to Advance Creativity in a Learning Environment

Students in a classroom can attempt to solve problems in a wide variety of creative ways. This lesson defines creativity and then covers barriers to thinking creatively, including response sets and functional fixedness. Finally, the lesson discusses different types of creative problem solving, including brainstorming and working backward.

Types of Problems & Problem Solving Strategies

11. Types of Problems & Problem Solving Strategies

We solve hundreds of small problems everyday. This lesson covers different types of problems, such as routine vs. non-routine, and many of the different problem-solving strategies we use, including algorithms, heuristics, graphic representations and the IDEAL Strategy.

Cognitive States: Definition & Examples

12. Cognitive States: Definition & Examples

A cognitive state is your thought processes and state of mind. In this lesson, you'll read about some examples of cognitive states, and also take a short quiz in order to test your understanding.

Method Of Loci: Definition & Example

13. Method Of Loci: Definition & Example

The Method of Loci has been used since ancient times to memorize important information. Discover the Method of Loci and learn how you can become a memory expert in this lesson.

Biology Bell Ringers

14. Biology Bell Ringers

In this lesson we will look at what a bell ringer is and why bell ringers are helpful to use in biology classrooms. We will also discuss several types of bell ringers that would be appropriate for a biology class.

Cloze: Procedure, Technique and Definition

15. Cloze: Procedure, Technique and Definition

The cloze procedure is something you will see a lot of throughout your teaching career. This lesson will define what a cloze procedure is and describe the technique and steps you should follow when implementing it in your classroom.

Critical Thinking Problems for Kids

16. Critical Thinking Problems for Kids

In today's world, critical thinking is a crucial part of being an active and engaged learner and thinker. This lesson will give you some problems that will help your students engage with thinking critically.

Extrinsic Rewards for Students: Definition & Examples

17. Extrinsic Rewards for Students: Definition & Examples

Extrinsic rewards for students are tangible rewards given by teachers to students to motivate them and reinforce performance and behavior. They are extrinsic because they come from outside the student rather than inside.

Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

18. Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

Being able to discriminate between facts and opinions is an important reading skill elementary students need to understand. But how do you tell the difference between the two? Luckily, there's a straight-forward way to teach fact and opinion. That's a fact. Trust me.

Fun Ways to Teach Vocabulary Words

19. Fun Ways to Teach Vocabulary Words

Teaching vocabulary words to students doesn't have to be boring and repetitive. In this lesson, you will learn methods to energize your classroom during vocabulary instruction. Afterwards, test your new knowledge with our quiz!

Higher Level Questions for Reading

20. Higher Level Questions for Reading

This lesson will highlight some higher-level questions that can be used for reading comprehension. Higher-level questions require students to think critically about the story or text that they are reading. A short quiz will follow to test your knowledge.

Higher Order Thinking Questions for Math Teachers

21. Higher Order Thinking Questions for Math Teachers

In classrooms across the country, higher order thinking questions are used on a daily basis. It can be challenging to incorporate higher order thinking questions into math instruction, but it is essential in helping students make connections to mathematical material.

Intellectual Ability: Definition & Dimensions

22. Intellectual Ability: Definition & Dimensions

Intellectual ability is a very broad term for how the mind operates. In this lesson we'll define intellectual ability, understand the process behind it, learn from an example, and see in what way chimpanzees have us beat.

Literacy Strategies for Teachers

23. Literacy Strategies for Teachers

The best way for children to grow as readers is for them to constantly practice and engage in reading. Reading research tells us that thinking about what your brain is doing when reading, or being metacognitive, helps one to progress in regard to comprehension. Children need not to just read, but they need to know and understand what and why they're reading. Implementing specific literacy strategies will help them accomplish this.

Morphology of English: Definition & Studies

24. Morphology of English: Definition & Studies

Morphology is the study of parts of language and how we use these parts to form words. In this lesson you'll find out the building blocks of language and how to use these blocks to construct words and deconstruct sentences. A short quiz follows.

Practical Applications of Calculus

25. Practical Applications of Calculus

We know that calculus, the study of how things change, is an important branch of mathematics. In fact, it's got some amazing applications outside the classroom. In this lesson we will learn about some the applications of calculus.

Project-Based Learning Examples

26. Project-Based Learning Examples

Project-based learning is an increasingly popular method of instruction in which students drive their own learning by completing projects. This lesson will provide you with several examples to use in your classroom.

Reflection Questions: Definition and Examples

27. Reflection Questions: Definition and Examples

Reflecting on learning is one of the best ways to consolidate skills and knowledge that a student has acquired. In this lesson, you will learn what makes a good reflection question, and you will see some examples of how a reflection question might look.

Story Sequencing: Activities & Games

28. Story Sequencing: Activities & Games

This lesson on story sequencing provides games and activities to be used when teaching students how to put a story in the correct order. Learn how to provide your students with activities to help them retain this reading skill.

Teaching Ethos, Pathos & Logos

29. Teaching Ethos, Pathos & Logos

Teaching the different rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, and logos) can sometimes be a challenge. This lesson will provide you with some activities you can use to help students master these concepts.

Teaching Kids About the Brain

30. Teaching Kids About the Brain

Your brain is an amazing machine. Every time you use it, billions of signals are carried between neurons. In fact, about 25% of your body's energy goes towards keeping your brain working. Ever wonder why you remember some things while other things fade? Let's take a look at what's going on inside your amazing brain!

Teaching Media Literacy in the Classroom

31. Teaching Media Literacy in the Classroom

Media literacy is an essential skill in the Common Core State Standards as well as in non-Common Core state skills requirements. In this lesson, we'll explore several examples and techniques for effectively teaching media literacy in your classroom.

Teaching Paragraph Writing

32. Teaching Paragraph Writing

Using published paragraphs as models in class can help students write stronger paragraphs through an examination of how authors utilize focus, organization, and evidence.

Technology Ethics in the Classroom

33. Technology Ethics in the Classroom

The accessibility of information through technology is endless. In the classroom, students and teachers must follow ethical guidelines for appropriate use. In this lesson you will learn what some of the expectations are and how to use them.

Using Music in the Classroom

34. Using Music in the Classroom

Music can unite people who are so different from each other. It can also be a wonderful educational tool for any age. This lesson gives you a few ideas for incorporating more music into your classroom practice.

Vocabulary Strategies for High School Teachers

35. Vocabulary Strategies for High School Teachers

Paced introduction, repetition, and creative presentation are all strategic approaches for teaching vocabulary. High School teachers are charged with preparing students for graduation and college entrance tests, and demonstrating maturity in language usage is a critical skill.

Activities that Inspire Divergent Thinking

36. Activities that Inspire Divergent Thinking

Divergent thinking is an important process that you should always be trying to engage your students in. This lesson will detail some activities you can use that will inspire divergent thinking in your students.

Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools

37. Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools

CBITS is a program designed to help school children cope with trauma-related difficulties. In this lesson, we will discuss what the program does, and how it is generally implemented in a school environment.

Broaden and Build Theory: Definition and Criticism

38. Broaden and Build Theory: Definition and Criticism

In this lesson you will explore what the broaden-and-build theory claims, some of the experiences that have occurred using the broaden-and-build approach, and a critical evaluation of the broaden-and-build theory.

What is Spacial Sequence Synesthesia?

39. What is Spacial Sequence Synesthesia?

Spacial-sequence synesthesia (SSS) is a phenomenon where you automatically assign spatial locations to the members of ordinal lists, such as the months of the year or the letters of the alphabet. This lesson will discuss the definition and causes of SSS, as well as the reported effects of this phenomenon.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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