Ch 3: Compass Reading Test: Types of Questions on the Exam

About This Chapter

This chapter exposes you to the types of questions you can expect to see on the ACT Compass Reading test. Learn and retain information about these question types by studying the text and video components within the chapter.

Compass Reading Test: Types of Questions on the Exam - Chapter Summary

Gain a solid understanding of the different kinds of questions you will be answering on the Compass Reading Test with the lessons in this chapter. The brief video lessons you will come across inform you on the different approaches to take depending on the question. Content in this chapter spans the following:

  • Detail and word meaning
  • Main ideas
  • Supporting details
  • Cause and effect and sequence of events
  • Author's tone
  • Logical fallacies
  • Argument structuring and supporting claims
  • Hypothesis, explanations and conclusions

After you have gone over the lessons, you can take quizzes for practice to assess your comprehension of the content. Each of the fun video lessons that you will come across has a corresponding lesson transcript to review.

ACT Compass Reading - Chapter Objectives

The ACT Compass Reading Test is used as a placement tool and assesses students' readiness for entry-level coursework in college. You'll see multiple-choice questions based on five different types of reading passages. This chapter tells you about the types of questions asked on the exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 3: Compass Reading Test: Types of Questions on the Exam
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
ACT Reading: Detail and Word Meaning Questions

1. ACT Reading: Detail and Word Meaning Questions

Easy points lurk in the detail questions on the ACT, so don't neglect them! In this lesson, you'll learn a 3-step method for answering these questions quickly and accurately.

ACT Reading: Main Idea and Generalization Questions

2. ACT Reading: Main Idea and Generalization Questions

Main idea questions can be some of the toughest nuts to crack on the ACT. In this lesson, you'll get some hints and tips for managing them like a pro.

Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

3. Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

Find out what supporting details are and their role in essay writing. Learn the different ways to include supporting details, then take a quiz to test your new skills.

ACT Reading: Cause and Effect and Comparison Questions

4. ACT Reading: Cause and Effect and Comparison Questions

Some ACT questions are tricky because they ask you about more than one piece of information at a time. In this lesson, you'll learn about two of those question types: cause/effect and comparison questions.

ACT Reading: Author's Tone and Method Questions

5. ACT Reading: Author's Tone and Method Questions

Get rhetorical and score some points on the ACT by understanding how to answer questions about an author's tone and method. We'll walk you through examples, plus tips for answering questions on the test.

Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

6. Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

News articles or other types of informational texts can be structured through a sequence of events or steps. In this lesson, we will examine how that is done and how to identify this structure.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

7. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Hypothesis, Explanations & Conclusions in Reading Passages

8. Hypothesis, Explanations & Conclusions in Reading Passages

All science experiments follow the same pattern in order to determine the truth. This lesson discusses how some reading passages use the similar structure of a hypothesis, explanation and conclusion to prove arguments.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

9. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Supportive vs. Unsupportive Claims in Reading Passages

10. Supportive vs. Unsupportive Claims in Reading Passages

This lesson will give you insight into the differences between evidence and claims, how evidence is used to create supported claims, and how to spot unsupported claims in reading passages.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support