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Ch 13: Compass Writing Test: Rhetorical Devices

About This Chapter

Gain a better understanding of rhetorical devices in writing by watching these entertaining video lessons. Study the lessons carefully and memorize the bolded keywords in the transcripts as you prepare for the Compass e-Write test.

Compass Writing Test: Rhetorical Devices - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you will learn how to improve your writing by adding stylistic elements to your prose. You will need to know about rhetorical devices on the Compass e-Write test, since by including these devices in your responses you will be simultaneously proving your ability to write eloquent arguments. After you complete this chapter, you should know more about the following:

  • Cliches and equivocations
  • Metaphors, allusion and illusion
  • Personification
  • Types of irony
  • Literary motifs
  • Catharsis and allegory
  • Consonance and assonance
  • Understatement, euphemisms and litotes
  • Symbolism, imagery, tone and mood

Our video lessons provide visual and audio information, allowing learners to see and hear the important points of each lesson. Furthermore, the lessons are broken down into short, easy-to-follow segments, which avoids information overload. Viewers can watch all the video lessons within a chapter, and they can also read each lesson's transcript to enrich their study sessions. Try using the timelines to skip around between major topics as well. If you are still nervous about taking the Compass e-Write test, try building your confidence by answering the questions in our lesson quizzes and on the chapter exam.

Compass Writing Test: Rhetorical Devices Objectives

The Compass e-Write test measures how well you can apply the rules of writing as you create your own written responses. Some colleges require you to take this exam alongside the writing skills exam, but some institutions may prefer to test only your actual ability to write. On this test, your written response will be judged on such factors as your ability to organize your thoughts, the quality of the content you present, and your use of style, which includes your ability to use rhetorical devices correctly.

16 Lessons in Chapter 13: Compass Writing Test: Rhetorical Devices
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

1. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations can be useful writing tools that strengthen documents when used appropriately. Learn the definitions of cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and explore examples of how to use them.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

2. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

A simile is a comparison of two things that are not alike. Learn the definition of simile, and explore examples of similes to understand how similes are used in literature. Review epic similes, compare similes to metaphors, and recognize the limitations of similes.

What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

3. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Authors of many different genres use foreshadowing to clue the reader in about future events in the story. Learn about several types of foreshadowing, including forms of direct foreshadowing, such as omens and prophecies commonly used in classic dramas, intentional misdirects like red herrings, and subtle foreshadowing, such as Chekhov's Gun and symbolic foreshadowing, which are seen more in contemporary works.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

4. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors, whether extended or mixed are commonly used to communicate ideas and emotions. Although similar, they play a very different role in language than similes. Take a moment to master the differences between these literary tools and learn when and how to apply each.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

5. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

While the words allusion and illusion may sound similar, they are not actually closely related to each other. Learn more about the definitions and examples of allusion (a literary term for an indirect reference to another person, work, person, place or event) and illusion (experiencing - seeing, hearing, tasting, touching, smelling - something that isn't really there).

Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

6. Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

Synecdoche and metonymy are two types of metaphorical expressions that use one word to represent another word or concept. Learn the definitions of synecdoche and metonymy, recognize how they differ, and explore examples of how they are used in literature and poetry.

Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

7. Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

Personification and apostrophe are literary devices that either describe or address non-human objects and ideas as if they were a person. Learn the differences between personification and apostrophe along with examples.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

8. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Irony is a literary device used in novels, plays, songs, and even everyday communication to humorously or emphatically react when reality does not meet expectations. Explore the definitions and examples of irony, and learn about the types of irony, including verbal, situational, and dramatic.

What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

9. What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

Literary motifs are defined as objects or ideas that recur throughout a work of literature. Discover important terms such as major theme, minor theme, subject, and thematic statement (and how they relate to motifs), as well as examples of motifs from 'The Great Gatsby' and 'Sense and Sensibility.'

What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

10. What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

Catharsis is when literature or drama provides strong emotional experiences that result in a sense of purification or emotional cleansing. Discover Aristotle's definition of catharsis plus examples and connections between catharsis and tragedy (Oedipus the King, Romeo and Juliet), catharsis and comedy (The Catcher in the Rye), and catharsis and Romanticism (Lord Byron).

Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

11. Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

Authors use allegory for literal and figurative storytelling in their works. Explore different types of allegory such as fables and parables, and discover some famous examples of allegory.

Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

12. Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

The use of sounds, words, and/or phrases help create mood or develop characters in written works. Discover examples of how consonance, assonance, and repetition add to the plot and/or mood of literary works.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

13. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

Litotes are a type of understatement rooted in negativity. Explore the use of understatement and litotes as a way to draw attention to a specific quality, to add humor, or to cast a negative light on something or someone, and discover examples from literature.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

14. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

Euphemisms allow for conversation about offensive, uncomfortable, or taboo subjects through alternate phrasing. Explore some examples of euphemism in everyday conversation and literature, including 'Hamlet' and 'The Great Gatsby'.

Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

15. Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

In literature, writers often use symbolism (an object, person, animal, color, etc. that represents an abstract idea) and imagery (descriptive language which appeals to all of the senses, adding layers of deeper meaning to a text). See examples of symbolism in works from Langston Hughes, Robert Burns, George Orwell and Kate Chopin, and examples of imagery from Langston Hughes and Sylvia Plath.

Tone vs. Mood: Interpreting Meaning In Prose

16. Tone vs. Mood: Interpreting Meaning In Prose

In writing, tone is the author's attitude toward a subject, while mood is the experience of the reader. Explore the literary choices that convey each of these concepts, and see the distinctions in writing examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
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